GI Bill: Education for Veterans Including Careers in Aviation!

January 26th, 2015

Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits:

If you are interested in a career in aviation and you are a Veteran, now is the time to take advantage of the Post 9/11 GI Bill to further your education! The PostGI Bill Careers in Aviation 9/11 GI Bill was put into effect in 2008 to provide education benefits for Veterans who have served on active duty for 90 or more days since Sept. 10, 2001. The VA-administered program provides benefits that are tiered based on the number of days served on active duty.  For approved members, the Post-9/11 GI Bill provides up to 36 months of education benefits, generally payable for 15 years following your release from active duty and can include:

  • Up to 100% Tuition and Fee Coverage
  • A Monthly Living (Housing) Stipend
  • Up to $1000 a year for Books and Supplies
  • A One Time Relocation Allowance
  • The Option to Transfer Benefits to Family MembersPost 9/11 GI Bill Benefit Chart

Types of Training Covered:

The following educational benefits are approved under the Post 9/11 GI Bill:

  • College degree programs including Associate, Bachelor, and advanced degree programs
  • Vocational/Technical Training including non-college degree programs
  • On-the-job/Apprenticeship Training
  • Licensing & Certification Training
  • National Testing Programs such as SAT, CLEP, AP, etc
  • Flight Training
  • Correspondence Training
  • Entrepreneurship Training
  • Work-study programs

In conjunction with The Post 9/11 GI Bill, there is The Yellow Ribbon Program, which can add additional financial help to the GI Bill benefits for qualifying Veterans. You can also transfer your benefits to your spouse or dependents! Take advantage of this great opportunity you have earned by serving your country. Once the VA has received your application they will determine your eligibility for the Post-9/11 GI Bill and you will be on your way to a new career…. possibly in AVIATION!

To apply for Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits: VA Form 22-1990.

More info:

VA Post 9/11 GI Benefits: http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/post911_gibill.asp

Yellow Ribbon Program:  http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/yellow_ribbon.asp

Flight Training under the GI Bill:  http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/flight_training.asp

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How you can become a professional career pilot

January 22nd, 2015

How you can become a professional career pilot

aircraft sales aircraft maintenance aerial videography

World needs pilots! Record growth leads to record need Half a million pilots needed globally.

CNN – Feb 13, 2014 - ”Released in August 2013, the Boeing Pilot and Technical Market Outlook for 2013-2032 forecasts nearly half a million new commercial airline pilots will be needed to fly all the new airplanes entering the world fleet over the next 20 years.”

ROTOR F/X is presenting a series of seminars to show you how you can become a professional career pilot in the airlines, corporate business and charter or helicopters and enter the exciting and rewarding world of aviation.

If you have ever dreamed of being a pilot and making it your career be sure to come and hear first hand from experienced pilots and instructors what is in store for you.
The seminars and presentations will cover:

  • All aspects of training and ratings from private pilot through ATP (Airline Transport Pilot)
  • Earning a two or four year university degree in aviation along with your flight training
  • Financing options for flight training
  • Financing options for university degree programs including special low interest government backed student loans
  • Job opportunities in all fields, now and in the near future
  • How you can have a guaranteed job working with us

Do not miss this opportunity to change your life and learn how to enter the fascinating and exciting world of flight.

Also included in the experience will be:

  • Aircraft displays – both airplane and helicopter
  • Aviation literature and films
  • Free 6 month subscription to “Flight Training Magazine” for all registered attendees
  • Flight tours and demonstration lessons both days at a special discount
  • Job opportunities in all fields, now and in the near future
  • FREE first lesson voucher for all signees on seminar dates

RECENT ARTICLES on “Pilot Shortage”

World needs pilots! Record growth leads to record need

- businessaircraftcenter.com

Pilot Shortage Looms, Boeing Report Says

- flyingmag.com

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Aircraft Dispatcher History: An Evolution

January 22nd, 2015

 

Aircraft Dispatcher History: An Evolution

Posted by  on Dec 8, 2014

Dispatchers serve as one of the most crucial component to the entire airline operation. Aircraft dispatchers are licensed airmen, certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Dispatchers must undergo extensive testing and training to earn this highly sought after certificate, and must pass both an extensive oral examination and the comprehensive written Aircraft Dispatcher test. These tests are equivalent to the Air Transport Pilot (ATP) written and oral examinations that airline pilots take as part of their licensing procedure. They are, in essence, pilots on the ground, and are as legally liable for the aircraft as is the pilot in the cockpit.

But how much do you really know about the history of the Aircraft Dispatcher? Here’s a short quiz to test your knowledge.

1) The first aircraft dispatchers were likely employees of:

a. The military
b. The Post Office
c. The airlines
d. The Treasury Department
e. None of the above

2) Early airline pilots knew exactly how to get to their destination.

True
False

3) Aircraft dispatchers were created for what reason?

a. Safety
b. Cost control
c. Congressional mandate
d. Navigational aid
e. All the above

4) Aircraft dispatchers and ‘flight followers’ are the same thing.

True
False

Back in the heady days of the 1920s, when people began to see airplanes as something more than an amusement, but as a viable way to cheaply move people and cargo around the country, it was as lawless as the Wild West. There were little to no federal regulations mandating policies and procedures for these emerging air carriers.

It was the norm for a pilot to just load up his aircraft with cargo, mail and passengers and take off. No flight plans, no weather information, nothing. In most instances, the pilot had a vague direction of his destination and pointed the nose of the craft in that general direction and, literally, winged it. They would use landmarks, a compass, and perhaps even the stars along the route to guide them.

An early dispatcherIt was fortuitous that the US Postal Service was beginning to establish radio stations along air transportation routes. The Air Mail Act of 1925 authorized the Post Office Department to contract with airlines to carry the mail, and these stations were built to aid those pilots by providing weather information and navigational assistance. Since most aircraft had only the most rudimentary of communications systems, they were not able to take advantage of these radio stations to their fullest benefit.

As you might imagine, the safety record for the industry was atrocious in those years. The loss of aircraft, lives and cargo (especially the US mail), due to mountains, changing weather, and power lines motivated Congress to pass the Civil Aeronautics Act in 1938. This legislation laid down strict regulations to ensure that all air carriers operated in as safe a manner as possible. The Act created an operational control structure, consisting of a system of checks and balances, which, when complied with, produced the highest level of safety possible for commercial airplane operations. It also created a new airman certification, that of an aircraft dispatcher.

The role of an aircraft dispatcher is important and complex. They are the ground-based eyes and ears for the pilot in the air. As stated earlier, regulations stemming from the CAA hold both the pilot and the dispatcher as being equally responsible for the safety of the flight. Working jointly with the pilot, the dispatcher draws up a flight plan that will allow the aircraft to arrive at its destination safely and as cost-efficiently as possible. They follow the developing weather along the route as well as at the final destination. They ensure the aircraft has all the provisions (fuel, food, etc.) needed to make the flight safely. They also track the flight to ensure it remains on course per the flight plan, keeping all ground support personnel aware of its progress.

Modern dispatcherOne point to remember: flight followers are not aircraft dispatchers. These two terms are not interchangeable, even though the flight follower can perform many of the same duties as that of a dispatcher. The most glaring difference is one of legality. Flight followers do not require certification, are not held responsible for the safety of the aircraft, nor do they have a say on if the flight has been validated for take-off. That responsibility rests with the dispatcher and the pilot, known as ‘Co-Authority Dispatch’.

The Aviation Institute of Maintenance is proud to offer an FAA-approved Aircraft Dispatcher Certification Program at its Orlando, FL facilities that exceeds the minimum hours required to meet the training objectives. The course prepares Aircraft Dispatcher students to take the FAA written, oral, and practical exams leading to issuance of an Aircraft Dispatcher license. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will have the background necessary to earn a FAA Aircraft Dispatcher Certificate.

As this certificate is highly recognized and powerful, those who possess it have the opportunity to apply for positions not only as Flight Dispatchers, but also as airline Crew Schedulers, Crew Planners, Navigation Data-base Specialists, Meteorology Assistants, Airport Flight Operations Agents, Ramp Control Tower Agents, and many other flight operations positions.

To learn more about this program, visit our Aircraft Dispatcher Program site, or visit our AIM-Orlando campus page to ask an admissions counselor for more information.

Tip of the hat goes to the Airline Dispatchers Federation for the image and historical content.

Quiz Answers:
1 – The Post Office
2 – False
3 – All the above
4 – False

Disclaimer – Aviation Institute of Maintenance makes no claim, warranty or guarantee as to actual employability or earning potential to current, past or future students and graduates of any career training program we offer. The Aviation Institute of Maintenance website is published for informational purposes only. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of information contained within; however, no warranty of accuracy is made. No contractual rights, either expressed or implied, are created by its content. The printed Aviation Institute of Maintenance catalog remains the official publication of Aviation Institute of Maintenance. The Aviation Institute of Maintenance website links to other websites outside the aviationmaintenance.edu domain. These links are provided as a convenience and do not constitute an endorsement. Aviation Institute of Maintenance exercises no control over, and assumes no responsibility for, information that resides on servers outside the aviationmaintenance.edu domain.

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Seven winter weather flying tips

January 21st, 2015
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Home / Tips and technique / Seven winter weather flying tips

Seven winter weather flying tips

C172 snow cockpit

As the season transitions from fall to winter and the temperature is consistently below freezing, unique challenges are presented to pilots. Flight training doesn’t need to stop in the winter though; in fact the colder months provide some great opportunities to expand your knowledge on weather and aircraft operations in less than ideal conditions. There are other benefits too, including improved aircraft performance and nearly unlimited visibility on clear days.

Here are some winter weather tips to consider as the temperature gets colder:

  1. Always carry winter weather gear – This first tip may seem like common sense, but I can’t stress enough the importance of carrying cold weather gear when the temperature gets below freezing. Most modern training airplanes provide a comfortable, warm cabin up in the air, even as the temperature approaches 0° F outside. This can cause a false sense of security and lead you into thinking that you may not need the extra clothing layers, gloves, hats, etc. But you have to always be prepared for an emergency landing, which could leave you in cold conditions for hours or even days. And the most important piece of cold weather gear? A cell phone of course.
  2. Don’t rule out frost after you land – Most flight schools and aircraft owners are very conscious about frost forming on the airplane when left out on clear nights when the temperature is close to or below freezing. If your flight needs to get out early in the morning, the airplane should be hangared overnight and pulled out just before departure. There’s another time when frost can sneak up on you though, causing a delay if you’re not prepared. Let’s say you takeoff just before sunrise and head to another airport not too far away to visit the airport diner. When you come back to your airplane 30 – 60 minutes later, there’s a good chance you’ll find a fresh layer of frost on the wings and tail.
  3. Practice takeoffs and landings on contaminated runways – Just because the runway at your airport has residual snow or slick spots doesn’t mean you have to cancel your flight lesson. In fact, ask any Alaskan bush pilot and they’ll probably tell you that landing on snow-covered runways is the norm rather than the exception in the winter. After a winter storm passes you’ll want to wait for the airport maintenance crew to clear the majority of snow from the runway. Then determine the braking action from the published NOTAM or from airport officials, which will be described as Good, Fair, Poor or Nil. If you and your instructor determine runway and braking conditions are suitable, continue on with your lesson. You’ll quickly learn the importance of speed control on final approach and how to make real-world use of the soft-field takeoff and landing techniques. Just be sure to taxi at slower than normal speeds and keep an eye on the wings when maneuvering near tall snow banks.
  4. Review cold weather procedures for your aircraft – There’s probably a good chance you haven’t reviewed your aircraft’s cold weather normal and emergency procedures since last year (unless you had an FAA pilot checkride over the summer). I like to make it a habit each fall to pull out the POH for each aircraft I fly and review cold weather starting limitations, normal procedures and emergency checklists pertinent to cold weather ops. You should commit to memory temperature and battery limitations, starter duty cycle limits and the first few items in the checklist for an engine fire during start.
  5. Recognize aircraft and engine limitations in cold weather – When the temperature is below freezing you’ll want to be more cautious about how you operate the aircraft engine. A good procedure is to avoid making sudden power changes as temperatures drop below 20°F and below. This means staying away from maneuvers like touch-n-gos, simulated engine failures and stall recoveries when the temperature is that cold.
  6. Call ahead for cold-weather airport services – This last tip is one to remember during your entire flying career. If you’re making a cross-country to another airport in the winter months and need some type of service from the FBO, call ahead first to verify it will be available. Don’t assume that because a particular FBO is at a large airport that they will have hangar space, engine pre-heat or other cold-weather service instantly available to you.
  7. Make reports about the conditions you experience – In my flying experience the best weather reports don’t come from the National Weather Service, but rather from the pilots currently in the air and reporting the weather conditions they’re experiencing. These pilot reports (PIREPs) will provide you with actual temperatures aloft, cloud coverage and tops, and turbulence and icing reports, all packed into just a few lines of data. As an instrument pilot in the winter, I pay close attention to the icing reports (or lack thereof) to help determine cruise altitudes and where there might be moisture-free air between cloud layers. Make it a point to contribute to the system and relay your flight conditions to ATC when time permits. And don’t get in the habit of only making PIREPs when you experience unfavorable conditions — some of the most useful PIREPs are the ones describing flight above the cloud layers in smooth air.

Aerostar snow

 

http://nblo.gs/12GaYp

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Airline Industry Leaders Gather at Embry-Riddle to Discuss Pilot Shortage

January 15th, 2015

Airline Industry Leaders Gather at Embry-Riddle to Discuss Pilot Shortage

James Roddey
Wed Jan 14, 2015 at 09:00 AM

ERAU Pilots

Embry-Riddle Airline Transport Pilot Certification grads Ethan Connor and Chin-Hsuan Hung

Representatives from the White House, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), major U.S. airlines, including Delta, American, Southwest, United and JetBlue, and many regional carriers met at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Daytona Beach Campus Jan.13 for a two-day Pilot Supply and Demand Summit.

Boeing has forecast a need in North America over the next two decades for 88,000 new commercial pilots. Stringent new FAA safety training rules to qualify first officers and the looming demand for new pilots is creating the need for comprehensive solutions from the airline industry, regulators and educators to address the potential professional pilot shortage.

“We were asked by the airline industry to convene a summit composed of airline representatives, federal officials and industry leaders to discuss the critical issue of pilot supply,” said Dr. Tim Brady, Dean of the College of Aviation at Embry-Riddle. “Despite a national debate on both sides of the pilot supply issue, the regional airlines are already feeling the effect. The shortage of qualified pilots has already begun to impact them deeply.”

Pilot Supply and Demand Summit discussions include new FAA flight training standards, manufacturing demands and forecasts, regional and legacy airline pilot attrition and hiring demands and how aviation universities like Embry-Riddle can support the industry.

For more information on the Pilot Supply and Demand Summit, contact Dr. Tim Brady @ (386) 226-6849. 

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, the world’s largest, fully accredited university specializing in aviation and aerospace, is a nonprofit, independent institution offering more than 70 baccalaureate, master’s and Ph.D. degree programs in its colleges of Arts & Sciences, Aviation, Business, Engineering and Security & Intelligence. Embry-Riddle educates students at residential campuses in Daytona Beach, Fla., and Prescott, Ariz., through the Worldwide Campus with more than 150 locations in the United States, Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and through online programs. The university is a major research center, seeking solutions to real-world problems in partnership with the aerospace industry, other universities and government agencies. For more information, visit http://www.embryriddle.edu, follow us on Twitter (@EmbryRiddle) andfacebook.com/EmbryRiddleUniversity, and find expert videos at YouTube.com/EmbryRiddleUniv.

Media Contact

James Roddey

Communications & Media Relations Manager, Daytona Beach, Fla.
Office: (386) 226-6198
james.roddey@erau.edu

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Guidance Aviation Celebrating Success at HELI-EXPO 2015

December 27th, 2014

Guidance Aviation Celebrating Success at HELI-EXPO 2015

guidanceblog

 HELI-EXPO 2014, CEO John Stonecipher accepts “Operational Excellence Award” fromSTARR Aviation.

Guidance Aviation will be exhibiting at HELI-EXPO 2015, celebrating sustained growth and success. 2013 and 2014 brought much recognition to the organization with CEO John Stonecipher earning the United State’s Small Business Administration’s Business Person of the Year Award in Washington, D.C. and the organization’s launch of its newest school in Baton Rouge, Lousiana.

Guidance Aviation continues to experience incredible success. To date, the helicopter flight training organization has 108 employees, representing a growth rate of over 40% with 31 new jobs created in 2014. The organization’s fleet has grown as well, operating three new Robinson R66 turbine aircraft for a total of 28 aircraft to date. Bolstering its training program, Guidance Aviation also acquired a new line of state-of-the-art helicopter flight simulators for a total of 24 simulators in operation throughout the organization.

Guidance Aviation is a military friendly organization with over half of its current employees Veterans of the U.S. Military. Visit Guidance Aviation at HELI-EXPO 2015 in Booth #2049www.guidance.aero

 

 

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The EAA: Experimental Aircraft Association

December 10th, 2014
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Paul Poberezny in the 1950′s constructing an aircraft tail section in his workshop. Photo courtesy of the EAA.

The EAA, Experimental Aircraft Association, is an international organization of aviation enthusiasts based in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Since its inception, it has grown internationally with over 180,000 members, and around 1,000 chapters in various countries, representing all areas of recreational aviation.  Membership is open to anyone interested in aviation and everyone is welcome to join!

The Baby Ace aircraft that introduced thousands of people to homebuilt aircraft and EAA, with Paul at the controls, in the 1950s. Photo courtesy of the EAA.

The EAA was founded in 1953 by veteran aviator Paul Poberezny who served in World War II and Korea.  The organization began as an aircraft homebuilding and restoring club.  The EAA’s first meeting place was in the basement of the Poberezny home. Later that year, the organization had its first EAA Fly-in Convention at the Curtiss-Wright Airport in Milwaukee with 21 airplanes and about 150 people and it grew quickly from there. In 1959, the EAA Fly-in Convention outgrew the convention site at Curtiss-Wright Field and was moved to Rockford, Illinois. In early 1964, the association’s first headquarters was built in the Milwaukee suburb of Franklin. By 1966, the organization had grown so much, that a new museum , office complex, and restoration facility were added to the EAA headquarters.

In 1970, the annual EAA Fly-in Convention needed more space and was moved to Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Then in 1983, the EAA moved its headquarters to Wittman Regional Airport as well. In 1998, the EAA Fly-in Convention name was changed to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh. Many refer to the fly-in simply as ‘Oshkosh’ and it has become an aviation mecca. The EAA Aviation Center in Oshkosh includes the EAA AirVenture Museum, housing more than 200 aircraft and 20,000 aviation artifacts.  It is the first aviation-only museum in the country to receive accreditation by the American Association of Museums.

 The EAA’s motto is ‘The Spirit of Aviation’ and EAA members represent every aspect of aviation.  It’s a community of passionate aviation enthusiasts that promotes and supports recreational flying and flying safety.  Aircraft homebuilding is still a large part of EAA, but the organization has grown over the years to include all areas of aviation and aeronautics.  The EAA inspires new participants to the world of aviation by encouraging affordable flying in local environments, protecting the right and freedom to fly, and by supporting and promoting aviation events and activities, to name a few.  It’s the aircraft that brings the EAA together, but it’s people who keep coming back, sharing a love of aviation with others, that keeps it going.

Today, in addition to events held at local chapters, the EAA continues to host AirVenture Oshkosh, which has become the largest gathering place for aviation enthusiasts from around the world for one week every year at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2014 had over 500,000 people from 69 countries and hundreds of exhibitors! Over 10,000 planes got to “rock your wings” as they flew into the world’s busiest airport (during the week of the convention) and land on colored dots…a definite bucket list experience for pilots worldwide!

Check out Oshkosh 2014:

Join the EAA family!  For more information about the EAA and AirVenture Oshkosh, go to www.eaa.org !

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Aviation Maintenance Technology Program has impact on San Joaquin Valley College (SJVC) Students

November 11th, 2014

 

SJVCFresno-Aircraft-Maintenance-instructor-Don-Dutra1

Aviation Maintenance  Technology Program has impact on San Joaquin Valley College SJVC Students

As an instructor for  San Joaquin Valley College’s (SJVC) Aviation Maintenance Technology (AMT) program, Don Dutra has seen every type of student join his Powerplant class. Those eager faces fresh out of high school, career-change seekers, and close-to-retirement adventurers who are finally fulfilling a dream, stare back at him. Aviation Maintenance  Technology Program has impact on SJVC Students.

“We get some students with zero experience and those who have been in the job market for awhile,” says Mr. Dutra.

No matter what their work background or experience level, the AMT program will have a positive impact. “Even when a student has not really decided that this is the right course for them, it is important that they keep working toward completion; not giving up,” says Dutra. “Maybe for the first time, they learned to finish what they started and to become good at something.”

What seems to be an obstacle to their success, if overcome, “helps graduates to become good employees – no matter what the field – and good civilians,” as Dutra calls it. “Many happy parents and spouses are grateful they finished and look forward to the next chapter.”

And, then there is the ‘natural,’ that person who was born to fly…or keep things flying.

“That student is motivated by being around aircraft; seeing all the different aspects of aviation,” says Dutra, whose program is located at Fresno-Yosemite National airport where students can look out on the runway and see aircraft take off and land daily.

“They don’t get bored seeing that, and they know that one day they’re going to be turning wrenches on similar aircraft,” Don says.

Mr. Dutra’s Powerplant class provides instruction in all facets of aircraft engines. Students are up to their shoulders in huge engines of all imaginable aircraft in the campus’ expansive hangar.

Don describes his teaching style as more ‘coaching’ than professorial. “I like to let my students learn from their own mistakes and then briefly explain what went right and what went wrong,” he says. “A belly flop makes a better point and they retain the information long-term.”

Don Dutra spent some of his 23-years as a Navy jet mechanic teaching ‘mechanics school’ to Navy and Marine recruits. After separation from the military he decided to get the formal education necessary to continue a career as an educator.

He earned his A.S. and B.A. degrees while going to school at night and working full-time for SJVC. He took the FAA exam to get his Inspector Authorization license. Don’s experience allowed him to bypass additional training for the test. He passed on his first try.

“Airframe and Powerplant certified mechanics with an IA endorsement is about the highest honor mechanics can achieve in their career,” says Jason Alves, Academic Dean.

During these years of balancing work, school, homework and home-life with his wife, Mary, Don lived the spread-thin life many of his students experience today. He can tell them first-hand that the end result is worth it.

“I am the very first person in my family to ever earn a college degree,” he says having grown up in Fresno in a family of eleven. But, he had good role models. “My mom worked hard her whole life, and my dad was a junk man who spent his life buying and selling cars, which is where I got my interest in engines.”

Don wants to make sure that his students get every bit of life and career experience he has to give them.

“I want our students to walk away with something that serves them in long-term employment and, hopefully, happiness,” he says. “When they walk away with their license, we know they’ve accomplished what they came here for and we’ve done what we are supposed to do.”

Judging from a long line of grads that stop by the campus, the successes are self-evident. Their claims of “I couldn’t have done it without you,” and “I am amazed and surprised at how much we learn here and apply on the job,” reinforce Don’s confidence in what the AMT program provides.

Toward this end, Don likes to plant seeds of wisdom and offer a little inspiration that might help his students get there from here.

“I tell them that there will always be the stories about the pilot who saved the day or landed the plane safely,” he says. “But, what you never hear about is the mechanic. It’s the mechanic – you – who puts that plane in the air; and it’s only going to stay there if you do your job right.”

Don’s words make a nice landing.

For more information on San Joaquin Valley College / Fresno Aviation please click on the following link to inquire about becoming an Aviation Technician:

http://www.aviationschoolsonline.com/school-info/San-Joaquin-Valley-College-AMT-Program/1253/3032/F/2.php

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PIA Instructor Receives Statewide Recognition

November 10th, 2014

PIA Vector Logo big- Plane

PIA Instructor Receives Statewide Recognition  

September 26, 2014 (Pittsburgh, PA) – The Aviation Council of Pennsylvania (ACP) recognized Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics (PIA) Instructor Dave Koehler as the recipient of their 2014 Education Award. The award was bestowed on Koehler for his work with PIA’s courses on Aircraft Instruments and Controls. Koehler, a PIA graduate and 14 year veteran of the instructional staff, was grateful for the acknowledgment. “I’m honored and flattered to even be nominated,” Koehler said. “It’s quite humbling to be recognized for my efforts.” Koehler brings a wide range of experience to the classroom, including work as a maintenance controller and quality control management. He constantly updates his teaching materials to reflect the latest advancements in the field of aviation. Many of Koehler’s pupils affirm the ACP’s selection, describing him as enthusiastic, knowledgeable and passionate. Koehler appreciates watching his students grow during their time at PIA. “I enjoy attending graduation and seeing the changes my students have undergone since going through my class,” Koehler said. The ACP also selected Corey Staley, a student at the Hagerstown Branch Campus, for their Aviation Technology Scholarship. The ACP focuses on improving and promoting aviation in both the government and private sector while increasing public awareness of aviation and aerospace. PIA President John Graham III serves as a member of the ACP Board of Directors. About Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics The school was opened by Glenn Curtiss and Orville Wright in 1927 as Curtiss-Wright Flying Service, and became PIA in 1929. PIA offers “hands-on” training for traditional and non- traditional students in Aviation Maintenance and Aviation Electronics. The instructional staff combine real world experience with class room instruction for an outstanding education. PIA also provides a wide range of student services while the student is in school, and after graduation.  The Career Services Department works one on one with students to reach their employment goals. PIA is often the first stop for many employers looking for quality employees. PIA offers an Associate in Specialized Technology Degree at its West Mifflin, PA location and Diploma programs in Youngstown, OH, Hagerstown, MD, and Myrtle Beach, SC.  There is open enrollment through the year accompanied with admissions requirements.   

For more information on Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics, Flight Schools, and Flight Instructor Jobs click: http://www.aviationschoolsonline.com/

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Flying the Feathered Edge: The Bob Hoover Project

November 5th, 2014

 

Watch the trailer of the amazing story of American aviation legend Bob Hoover!

“FLYING THE FEATHERED EDGE is a very special documentary film about aviation, innovation, ruggedness, precision, testing, excellence… and getting it right.

Machines alone could not have pushed the airplane forward. It took courage, and out of the box thinking. This film, about the authentic life of a dedicated American and our greatest living aviator, R.A. “Bob” Hoover, shows how by pushing the edge of the flight envelope, a handful of pilots enabled aviation to be safer for others — indefinitely.

WWII veteran and prisoner of war, Bob Hoover escaped Stalag Luft 1 and flew to safety by stealing an enemy aircraft. As an accomplished experimental test pilot, he participated in breaking the speed of sound and launching the world into the Jet Age. During his unrivaled international air show career, he performed for millions of spectators worldwide for over three decades.

The purpose of the film is to celebrate the spirit of the American fighter pilot, show the courage and the innovation that was essential to the birth of the jet age, and to enable the audience to relive incredible stories from a man born of simple beginnings in Tennessee who lived his dream of becoming the pilot he always wanted to be.

Filmmaker Kim Furst is an award winning director and editor of popular documentaries. Recent work includes Discovery Channel’s three part series ‘Rocket Challenge,” film editor of “One Six Right,” producer/director for AirshowBuzz’s “The Horsemen Cometh” about a formation aerobatics P-51 team, and producer of 5 hours of behind the scenes documentaries for “Mission Impossible 3,” for which she won the Golden Satellite Award, that industry’s highest award.”

Flying the Feathered Edge: The Bob Hoover Project links:
YouTube! http://www.youtube.com/thepilotspilot
Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/TheBobHooverP…
Twitter! http://twitter.com/FlyngFethrdEdge
Webs! http://www.thebobhooverproject.com

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