Archive for October, 2015

Ground-breaking Aircraft Crash Avoidance System Enhances Runway Safety

Thursday, October 29th, 2015

Introducing Aerial, Landing, & Takeoff Aircraft Crash Avoidance System (ALTACAS)

COLUMBIA, S.C., Oct. 29, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — ALTACAS TECHNOLOGY today announced the latest patented innovation in aircraft crash avoidance technology primarily designed to target and provide an effective, practical solution to enhance runway safety during takeoffs and landings, while preventing collisions during climbs, mid-flights, and descents.

Latest data from www.planecrashinfo.com shows 20% of fatal accidents occurred during takeoffs and initial climb, while 46% occurred during initial approach, final approach, and landing. The majority caused by human errors. The present day use of drones may increase these alarming statistics. For example, on March 22, 2014, US Airways Flight 4650 nearly collided with a drone while landing at the Tallahassee Regional Airport.

Among these statistics, runway incursions are the most prominent, which are incidents where a takeoff or landing aircraft is threatened by an unauthorized aircraft, vehicle, or person on a runway. In theUSA alone, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reported 1,264 runway incursions in 2014, a noticeable increase from 966 in 2010. Also, latest statistics from the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), a United Nation Specialized Agency, shows runway related issues as the highest among “Occurrence Categories” at nearly 60%, and that runway excursion and incursions accounted for 19% of all accidents and serious incidents.

Several years ago, inventor and the company’s chief engineer Bryan Smalls was informed by associates that the US government was looking for ways to reduce runway incidents. This information led him to conceptualize and patent ALTACAS, which employs LIDAR radar and remote sensing technology along with GPS tracking technology. Its automated systems allows individual aircrafts to particularly monitor runways and airways of initial climbs before takeoffs while allowing inbound aircrafts to monitor airways and runways before landing, thereby minimizing runway incursions.  The existing crash avoidance system mainly targets mid-flight aircrafts. ALTACAS also effectively monitors mid-flight aircrafts.

ALTACAS pinpoint accuracy detects, warns, and tracks aircrafts of possible collision while providing evasive course of action. Its automated systems provides imagery, distance, speed, and direction of oncoming aircrafts and non-aircrafts vehicles, while simultaneously opening a three-way communication between pilots and air traffic controllers to defuse crisis. Sensor activated lightings alongside runways allows takeoff aircrafts to identify runway usage to incoming aircrafts and warn others on intersecting runways. Aircrafts in the vicinity receive audible warning that runway is in use.

ALTACAS reduces aircraft incidents caused by human errors and provides pilots and air traffic control additional reaction time to prevent collisions. Mr. Smalls says, “Every second is indispensible when aircrafts are on a collision course. Any safety system providing additional time may help avert a catastrophe and save the loss of lives and property.”

Mr. Smalls believes ALTACAS technology can be retrofitted into existing aircrafts’ safety systems, and may prove useful to trains and ships in the near future. He knows this venture will take a concerted effort by the government and private companies to implement. Consequently, he thinks it would be best to make this concept and patent available to others for licensing or sales. Additional information and a demo video can be seen at www.altacas.technology or www.altacas.com. For further information, please call (803) 724-1233 or 1-866-875-1101, or contact us by email at info@altacas.technology, or by mail at ALTACAS TECHNOLOGY, P.O. Box 24615, Columbia, SC 29224.

Video – https://youtu.be/vcH8mPTxQA8

 SOURCE ALTACAS TECHNOLOGY

Related Links

http://www.altacas.comhttp://https://youtu.be/vcH8mPTxQA8

find a school button

NASA, Global Aviation Leaders Talk Green Aviation and More at Annual Summit

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

nasaImages NASA - routes of air navigation in EuropaWASHINGTON, Oct. 8, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Representatives from 21 aviation research organizations around the world came together this week at NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California to explore solutions for many of today’s most significant aviation challenges.

Hosted this year by NASA, the sixth annual International Forum for Aviation Research (IFAR) Summit, which wrapped up Thursday, provided a non-competitive environment where global aviation leaders evaluated the progress of technical collaborations on issues. These included the environmental impacts of aviation; alternative fuels research; developing a global approach to air traffic management research; supersonic aircraft; and wind tunnel testing. The IFAR Steering Committee also proposed a strategy to ensure the group’s long-term sustainability.

“IFAR membership is growing and the group is maturing with every passing year,” said Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator of NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate in Washington and current IFAR chair. “More and more countries understand that forming a cohesive group to leverage our respective resources can make real progress on solving many of the global aviation issues we all face.”

IFAR participants commended NASA for its leadership in alternative fuels and air traffic management research and development, and its supersonics working groups. They agreed these working groups should continue their important work for the foreseeable future. Research into aircraft efficiency, noise and weather, which is led by the German Aerospace Center, French aerospace lab ONERA, and Netherlands Aerospace Centre also were highlighted as focus areas warranting innovative collaborations.

In addition to its scientific and technical expertise, IFAR promotes exchanges among young aviation scientists and engineers. During a Young Researchers Conference held at this year’s summit, 18 participants from a number of countries, including the United States,Germany, Japan, and South Africa exchanged views on the future of aviation as contributions to IFAR’s own vision.

The next IFAR summit will be hosted in the fall of 2016 by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute in Daejeon, Republic of South Korea.

For more information about IFAR, go to:
http://www.ifar.aero

For more information about how NASA is with you when you fly, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/aeronauticsnasa

find a school button

FAA Administrator Signals Safety Evolution

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015

Plane above morning Earth

Speaking today at the Flight Safety Foundation’s Newsmaker Breakfast at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, Federal AviationAdministration (FAA) Administrator Michael Huerta announced the next step in the FAA’s continuing evolution of working with those it regulates. The FAA developed the new Compliance Philosophy to  enhance our ability to find safety problems before they result in an incident or accident, use the best tools to fix those problems, and then monitor the situation to ensure that no new problems develop. This approach recognizes that most operators comply with the rules and use Safety Management Systems to identify hazards. They then assess the risks from those hazards, and put measures in place to mitigate the risks.

The Compliance Philosophy challenges the status quo. The FAA wants safe operators, not operators who inadvertently make a mistake and then hide it because they’re afraid they will be punished. Based on cooperation and trust, it encourages an open and transparent exchange of information and data between the FAA and industry. The Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) successfully used this approach to reduce the risk in U.S. commercial aviation by 83 percent over 10 years.

“The FAA’s Compliance Philosophy helps the FAA and industry to use critical thinking to work smarter and more efficiently to get to the bottom of potential safety problems,” said Huerta. “It’s about finding a problem, fixing a problem, and making sure it stays fixed.”

Huerta stressed that the FAA will continue to have zero tolerance for intentional reckless behavior, inappropriate risk-taking, repeat failures, falsification, failure to fulfill commitments, or deviation from regulatory standards.  The FAA will continue to vigorously pursue enforcement action in these circumstances.

Read FAA Administrator Huerta’s speech on FAA.gov.

find a school button