Archive for the ‘Aviation Industry News’ Category

How you can become a professional career pilot

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

How you can become a professional career pilot

aircraft sales aircraft maintenance aerial videography

World needs pilots! Record growth leads to record need Half a million pilots needed globally.

CNN – Feb 13, 2014 - ”Released in August 2013, the Boeing Pilot and Technical Market Outlook for 2013-2032 forecasts nearly half a million new commercial airline pilots will be needed to fly all the new airplanes entering the world fleet over the next 20 years.”

ROTOR F/X is presenting a series of seminars to show you how you can become a professional career pilot in the airlines, corporate business and charter or helicopters and enter the exciting and rewarding world of aviation.

If you have ever dreamed of being a pilot and making it your career be sure to come and hear first hand from experienced pilots and instructors what is in store for you.
The seminars and presentations will cover:

  • All aspects of training and ratings from private pilot through ATP (Airline Transport Pilot)
  • Earning a two or four year university degree in aviation along with your flight training
  • Financing options for flight training
  • Financing options for university degree programs including special low interest government backed student loans
  • Job opportunities in all fields, now and in the near future
  • How you can have a guaranteed job working with us

Do not miss this opportunity to change your life and learn how to enter the fascinating and exciting world of flight.

Also included in the experience will be:

  • Aircraft displays – both airplane and helicopter
  • Aviation literature and films
  • Free 6 month subscription to “Flight Training Magazine” for all registered attendees
  • Flight tours and demonstration lessons both days at a special discount
  • Job opportunities in all fields, now and in the near future
  • FREE first lesson voucher for all signees on seminar dates

RECENT ARTICLES on “Pilot Shortage”

World needs pilots! Record growth leads to record need

- businessaircraftcenter.com

Pilot Shortage Looms, Boeing Report Says

- flyingmag.com

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Seven winter weather flying tips

Wednesday, January 21st, 2015
 SportysLTFH-Header1

Home / Tips and technique / Seven winter weather flying tips

Seven winter weather flying tips

C172 snow cockpit

As the season transitions from fall to winter and the temperature is consistently below freezing, unique challenges are presented to pilots. Flight training doesn’t need to stop in the winter though; in fact the colder months provide some great opportunities to expand your knowledge on weather and aircraft operations in less than ideal conditions. There are other benefits too, including improved aircraft performance and nearly unlimited visibility on clear days.

Here are some winter weather tips to consider as the temperature gets colder:

  1. Always carry winter weather gear – This first tip may seem like common sense, but I can’t stress enough the importance of carrying cold weather gear when the temperature gets below freezing. Most modern training airplanes provide a comfortable, warm cabin up in the air, even as the temperature approaches 0° F outside. This can cause a false sense of security and lead you into thinking that you may not need the extra clothing layers, gloves, hats, etc. But you have to always be prepared for an emergency landing, which could leave you in cold conditions for hours or even days. And the most important piece of cold weather gear? A cell phone of course.
  2. Don’t rule out frost after you land – Most flight schools and aircraft owners are very conscious about frost forming on the airplane when left out on clear nights when the temperature is close to or below freezing. If your flight needs to get out early in the morning, the airplane should be hangared overnight and pulled out just before departure. There’s another time when frost can sneak up on you though, causing a delay if you’re not prepared. Let’s say you takeoff just before sunrise and head to another airport not too far away to visit the airport diner. When you come back to your airplane 30 – 60 minutes later, there’s a good chance you’ll find a fresh layer of frost on the wings and tail.
  3. Practice takeoffs and landings on contaminated runways – Just because the runway at your airport has residual snow or slick spots doesn’t mean you have to cancel your flight lesson. In fact, ask any Alaskan bush pilot and they’ll probably tell you that landing on snow-covered runways is the norm rather than the exception in the winter. After a winter storm passes you’ll want to wait for the airport maintenance crew to clear the majority of snow from the runway. Then determine the braking action from the published NOTAM or from airport officials, which will be described as Good, Fair, Poor or Nil. If you and your instructor determine runway and braking conditions are suitable, continue on with your lesson. You’ll quickly learn the importance of speed control on final approach and how to make real-world use of the soft-field takeoff and landing techniques. Just be sure to taxi at slower than normal speeds and keep an eye on the wings when maneuvering near tall snow banks.
  4. Review cold weather procedures for your aircraft – There’s probably a good chance you haven’t reviewed your aircraft’s cold weather normal and emergency procedures since last year (unless you had an FAA pilot checkride over the summer). I like to make it a habit each fall to pull out the POH for each aircraft I fly and review cold weather starting limitations, normal procedures and emergency checklists pertinent to cold weather ops. You should commit to memory temperature and battery limitations, starter duty cycle limits and the first few items in the checklist for an engine fire during start.
  5. Recognize aircraft and engine limitations in cold weather – When the temperature is below freezing you’ll want to be more cautious about how you operate the aircraft engine. A good procedure is to avoid making sudden power changes as temperatures drop below 20°F and below. This means staying away from maneuvers like touch-n-gos, simulated engine failures and stall recoveries when the temperature is that cold.
  6. Call ahead for cold-weather airport services – This last tip is one to remember during your entire flying career. If you’re making a cross-country to another airport in the winter months and need some type of service from the FBO, call ahead first to verify it will be available. Don’t assume that because a particular FBO is at a large airport that they will have hangar space, engine pre-heat or other cold-weather service instantly available to you.
  7. Make reports about the conditions you experience – In my flying experience the best weather reports don’t come from the National Weather Service, but rather from the pilots currently in the air and reporting the weather conditions they’re experiencing. These pilot reports (PIREPs) will provide you with actual temperatures aloft, cloud coverage and tops, and turbulence and icing reports, all packed into just a few lines of data. As an instrument pilot in the winter, I pay close attention to the icing reports (or lack thereof) to help determine cruise altitudes and where there might be moisture-free air between cloud layers. Make it a point to contribute to the system and relay your flight conditions to ATC when time permits. And don’t get in the habit of only making PIREPs when you experience unfavorable conditions — some of the most useful PIREPs are the ones describing flight above the cloud layers in smooth air.

Aerostar snow

 

http://nblo.gs/12GaYp

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Airline Industry Leaders Gather at Embry-Riddle to Discuss Pilot Shortage

Thursday, January 15th, 2015

Airline Industry Leaders Gather at Embry-Riddle to Discuss Pilot Shortage

James Roddey
Wed Jan 14, 2015 at 09:00 AM

ERAU Pilots

Embry-Riddle Airline Transport Pilot Certification grads Ethan Connor and Chin-Hsuan Hung

Representatives from the White House, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), major U.S. airlines, including Delta, American, Southwest, United and JetBlue, and many regional carriers met at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Daytona Beach Campus Jan.13 for a two-day Pilot Supply and Demand Summit.

Boeing has forecast a need in North America over the next two decades for 88,000 new commercial pilots. Stringent new FAA safety training rules to qualify first officers and the looming demand for new pilots is creating the need for comprehensive solutions from the airline industry, regulators and educators to address the potential professional pilot shortage.

“We were asked by the airline industry to convene a summit composed of airline representatives, federal officials and industry leaders to discuss the critical issue of pilot supply,” said Dr. Tim Brady, Dean of the College of Aviation at Embry-Riddle. “Despite a national debate on both sides of the pilot supply issue, the regional airlines are already feeling the effect. The shortage of qualified pilots has already begun to impact them deeply.”

Pilot Supply and Demand Summit discussions include new FAA flight training standards, manufacturing demands and forecasts, regional and legacy airline pilot attrition and hiring demands and how aviation universities like Embry-Riddle can support the industry.

For more information on the Pilot Supply and Demand Summit, contact Dr. Tim Brady @ (386) 226-6849. 

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, the world’s largest, fully accredited university specializing in aviation and aerospace, is a nonprofit, independent institution offering more than 70 baccalaureate, master’s and Ph.D. degree programs in its colleges of Arts & Sciences, Aviation, Business, Engineering and Security & Intelligence. Embry-Riddle educates students at residential campuses in Daytona Beach, Fla., and Prescott, Ariz., through the Worldwide Campus with more than 150 locations in the United States, Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and through online programs. The university is a major research center, seeking solutions to real-world problems in partnership with the aerospace industry, other universities and government agencies. For more information, visit http://www.embryriddle.edu, follow us on Twitter (@EmbryRiddle) andfacebook.com/EmbryRiddleUniversity, and find expert videos at YouTube.com/EmbryRiddleUniv.

Media Contact

James Roddey

Communications & Media Relations Manager, Daytona Beach, Fla.
Office: (386) 226-6198
james.roddey@erau.edu

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PIA Instructor Receives Statewide Recognition

Monday, November 10th, 2014

PIA Vector Logo big- Plane

PIA Instructor Receives Statewide Recognition  

September 26, 2014 (Pittsburgh, PA) – The Aviation Council of Pennsylvania (ACP) recognized Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics (PIA) Instructor Dave Koehler as the recipient of their 2014 Education Award. The award was bestowed on Koehler for his work with PIA’s courses on Aircraft Instruments and Controls. Koehler, a PIA graduate and 14 year veteran of the instructional staff, was grateful for the acknowledgment. “I’m honored and flattered to even be nominated,” Koehler said. “It’s quite humbling to be recognized for my efforts.” Koehler brings a wide range of experience to the classroom, including work as a maintenance controller and quality control management. He constantly updates his teaching materials to reflect the latest advancements in the field of aviation. Many of Koehler’s pupils affirm the ACP’s selection, describing him as enthusiastic, knowledgeable and passionate. Koehler appreciates watching his students grow during their time at PIA. “I enjoy attending graduation and seeing the changes my students have undergone since going through my class,” Koehler said. The ACP also selected Corey Staley, a student at the Hagerstown Branch Campus, for their Aviation Technology Scholarship. The ACP focuses on improving and promoting aviation in both the government and private sector while increasing public awareness of aviation and aerospace. PIA President John Graham III serves as a member of the ACP Board of Directors. About Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics The school was opened by Glenn Curtiss and Orville Wright in 1927 as Curtiss-Wright Flying Service, and became PIA in 1929. PIA offers “hands-on” training for traditional and non- traditional students in Aviation Maintenance and Aviation Electronics. The instructional staff combine real world experience with class room instruction for an outstanding education. PIA also provides a wide range of student services while the student is in school, and after graduation.  The Career Services Department works one on one with students to reach their employment goals. PIA is often the first stop for many employers looking for quality employees. PIA offers an Associate in Specialized Technology Degree at its West Mifflin, PA location and Diploma programs in Youngstown, OH, Hagerstown, MD, and Myrtle Beach, SC.  There is open enrollment through the year accompanied with admissions requirements.   

For more information on Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics, Flight Schools, and Flight Instructor Jobs click: http://www.aviationschoolsonline.com/

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Aviation: The Invisible Highway – narrated by Harrison Ford – Official Trailer #1

Friday, August 29th, 2014

Official trailer for AVIATION: THE INVISIBLE HIGHWAY: A story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world. The documentary is produced and directed by Brian J. Terwilliger (“One Six Right”), narrated by Harrison Ford, and features an original score by Academy Award-winning composer James Horner. It’s scheduled for a 2015 release.

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Slow Down and Save: Airline Pilots Around the World Ordered to Slash Sky Time

Monday, January 20th, 2014

Slow Down and Save: Airline Pilots Around the World Ordered to Slash Sky Time

 

Every motorist knows the value of easing up on the accelerator to save on fuel consumption, and cash-strapped airlines are now following their example and ordering their pilots to slow down in an effort to save fuel. Escalating oil prices have led to a fall in profits for many airlines, and even budget airline Ryanair reported that its profits had fallen by a fifth. Concerned passengers needn’t worry as flight times will not be increased by more than a few minutes, but just this slight increase in journey time could save airlines hundreds of millions of dollars in fuel costs.

 

Airlines That Are Slowing Down 

 

Ryanair recently announced that it will add two minutes to every hour of flight time, and this small extension will result in a 15% overall reduction on the airline’s fuel bill. Ryanair’s profits fell by 21% over the last quarter despite passenger numbers increasing by 3%. Their revenue had also increased by 5%, but a fuel cost increase of 6% meant that any extra profits were immediately eaten up by their increased fuel bill. Ryanair came under fire earlier this year after pilots were instructed to reduce the amount of emergency fuel they carried on board to save on costs. Several US airlines have been slowing down their flights since 2008, and companies such as Southwest Airlines managed to save $42 million in a year by extending flight times by just one or two minutes.

 

Military Cutbacks 

 

Even the military has had to take some drastic measures to reduce its fuel costs, and formation flying has been found to offer the perfect solution for military jets. Vortex surfing is the practice of flying one plane behind another in a V formation allowing the rear planes to ride in slipstreams created by the one in front. This technique is most commonly observed in nature, and large birds flying in an arrow shape is a perfect example of vortex surfing. To experience the thrill of flying yourself, visit wish.co.uk for a wide range of different flight options. The US military report that they have managed to cut their fuel costs by 10% after adopting this technique, and it is only a matter of time before commercial airlines begin considering it for their fleets. Last year the US Air Force was ordered to slow its fleet of 4,693 aircraft after rising fuel costs added an extra $1 billion to its 2012 fuel bill.

 

Rising fuel costs are something motorists and homeowners have been battling with for several years, and the cost of filling up the car has almost doubled over the last ten years. As well as saving on fuel costs, driving or flying more economically will have a dramatic effect on the environment as the majority of greenhouse gases are produced by transportation emissions and the burning of fossil fuels. Fuel economy should be a priority for every motorist, and government schemes to reduce the amount of cars on the road will soon have to become more prominent in order to tackle global warming.

by Paul Guerrier

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Chris Horton, CFI-I, Manager of Flight Operations, Guidance Aviation, Nationally Recognized as Recipient of AgustaWestland Safety Excellence Award

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

The 2014 AgustaWestland Safety Excellence Award recipient is Mr. Chris Horton, CFI-I, Manager of Flight Operations, Guidance Aviation. Helicopter Association International (HAI) announced the winners of the 2014 Salute to Excellence Awards, which “recognize those who, through either a single act or a lifetime of service and dedication, have exemplified the best the helicopter industry has to offer during the previous year….As helicopters serve the needs of society around the world, there are those in our industry who go above and beyond. “We are honored to be able to recognize their achievements,” said HAI President Matt Zuccaro.” [SOURCE: Rotor.org]

The AgustaWestland Safety Award acknowledges outstanding contributions in the promotion of safety and safety awareness throughout the international helicopter community.

“I can’t think of a harder working or more deserving pilot. Chris’s contributions are paramount to the success of the Guidance Aviation SMS,” stated John Stonecipher, President, CEO, Guidance Aviation.

Chris Horton, helicopter flight instructor (CFI-I) and airplane pilot, discovered his passion for aviation safety as an undergraduate student at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Horton joined Guidance Aviation in 2010 and rapidly advanced to the position of Manager of Flight Operations. He is responsible for the daily operations of over 100 full time students, 20 flight instructors, and over 300 weekly flight operations. With schools in Prescott, Arizona and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Guidance Aviation has a staff of just over 50 employees and a fleet of 16 helicopters.

Since his start at Guidance, Horton has drafted the Emergency Response Plan, formed the Safety Board, drafted the Safety Management System Manual, and created the Safety Excellence Award Program. Horton established three safety stand down days per year, each focusing on current safety initiatives. His work developing a Safety Management System at Guidance Aviation was recognized through STARR Aviation and received public recognition as a leader in SMS training.

Horton has taken courses in Safety Management Systems, Advanced Safety Management Systems, Human Factors: Threat and Error Management, Emergency Response, Accident Investigation, and Aircraft Survivability Analysis and Design.

You can review Chris Horton’s entire story at: http://www.guidance.aero/chris-horton-guidance-aviation-agustawestland-safety-excellence-award/

 

 

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Sport Aviation Expo Starts Thursday – AVweb

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Sport Aviation Expo Starts Thursday

The Sport Aviation Expo is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year and the show is all set to go at Sebring Airport in central Florida starting Thursday. The show is the only one dedicated to the Light Sport aviation segment and was started shortly after the FAA created the new aircraft classification. Most of the leading airframers and secondary suppliers will be there with static displays and flight demos. A few days before the show, Progressive Aerodyne announced it had received FAA approval for the Elite version of its Light Sport amphib. The new aircraft sports a turbocharged Rotax 914 and a glass panel. Also among the exhibitors is Van’s, which recently announced it will continue production of its ready-to-fly RV-12 Light Sport model.

The show always has a packed agenda of forums and information sessions. This year’s is headlined by CDR Barry Hull of Pilot Judgment Inc. with a presentation called The Number One Killer of Pilots and How to Prevent It. Anyone who wants to fly in certain kinds of controlled airspace, including those flying Light Sport aircraft, will have to have ADS-B equipment and Peter Ring, of Freeflight Systems, will offer a primer on the mandatory equipage issues. There are also lots of technical forums, including Phil Lockwood’s annual session on the care and feeding of Rotax engines.

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Training Begins for Around The World Flight

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

Think Global CrewApril 03 2013, Prescott, Arizona – The Think Global Flight Crew, Capt. Judy Rice and Navigator Fred Nauer, arrive in Prescott today to continue training for their flight around the world to promote Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics education.  Guidance Aviation of Prescott, Arizona, has donated the Cirrus SR20 G3 for the effort.

Capt. Rice, CFI, an experience educator and aviator, and Fred Nauer, CFI-I, a retired airline Captain, will begin some recurrent training in the Cirrus SR20 G3 at Guidance Aviation and will also be speaking with media on Thursday, April 4, 2013.

Marlin Kuykendall, Mayor of the City of Prescott shared that, “We are excited that our airport will launch the Think Global flight.  This particular partnership with Guidance Aviation showcases that Prescott is on the map in Arizona and around the world.  We are looking forward to welcoming more aviation and technology business partners like Guidance Aviation to Prescott Airport.”

The Think Global Flight Crew and its Cirrus SR20 G3 are scheduled to take off in April of 2014 and fly around the world, stopping at schools in numerous countries to promote S.T.E.M. education and what the promises of aviation and aerospace hold for our future pilots, aeronautical engineers, and aerospace professionals.  This effort is unique in that Think Global is leveraging the latest in aviation and web based technologies to communicate with the school kids around the globe, in real time, delivering S.T.E.M. based curricula relating to the flight.  While in flight, the crew will be contacting Student Command Centers (SCC’s) via satellite phone to discuss flight planning, weather, international relations, and weight and balance requirements.  Students may also log into the website to access curricula developed by education and aviation professionals.

This April 5, 2013, the Think Global Flight Crew and the Cirrus SR20 G3 will be taking off from the Guidance Aviation ramp at the Prescott Airport to be on display at the Sun n’ Fun Air show in Lakeland, Florida.

Think Global Flight Website:  http://www.thinkglobalflight.org

Think Global Flight Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/thinkglobalflight

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ATP Supports Women in Aviation through Scholarship Award

Friday, March 15th, 2013

Tonya Hodson, left. Courtney Dennis, ATP, right.

March 14, 2013 – Jacksonville, FL – ATP announced today that Tonya Susann Hodson, from Salina, KS is the recipient of a 10-hour Multi-Engine Instructor Rating Scholarship to be presented at the 24th annual Women in Aviation (WAI) Conference taking place this week in Nashville, TN. The presentation of this award represents a continued effort by ATP to support the work of Women in Aviation and its members. The scholarship awarded is valued at $4,000.

Tonya Susann Hodson is a student of Kansas State University in Salina, Kansas who anticipates graduating with Bachelors of Science in the Professional Pilot program in December of 2013.  She currently holds commercial pilot certificates for both single- and multi-engine aircraft is working on her flight instructor certificate.  A Dean’s Honor Roll student, Tonya has also been active as an Air Race Classic Top Ten Competitor, a competitor in and organizer of the National Intercollegiate Flight Association’s SAFECON Safety Conference, and has taken both formation and aerobatic flight training.  When asked about her aviation career goals, Tonya said, “in five years I will be employed in the aviation industry sharing my experience and expertise. In ten years, my career will be secure providing training and instruction through knowledge, leadership, and passion.”  Tonya wants to give back to the aviation industry in every way she can.

“ATP recognizes the importance of supporting students and especially the next generation of female aviators,” said ATP Vice President, Jim Koziarski.  ”The recommendations of faculty at Kansas State University highlight Tonya’s professionalism and the passion she brings to her aviation career goals, making her a recipient I know ATP will be proud to help succeed in aviation.”

For more information about ATP, visit ATPFlightSchool.com or visit ATP at the conference at Booth #1023.

In 1984, ATP pioneered accelerated, professional multi-engine flight training with an emphasis on pilot career development. Today ATP’s Airline Career Pilot Program prepares pilots for airline careers with nationwide flying experience in multi-engine aircraft. In partnership with the leading regional and national airlines, ATP offers its students an airline-sponsored career track from zero time to 1500 hours, with CFI job placement and airline employment. ATP flies over 9,000 hours to provide more than 350 FAA pilot certificates every month across 28 locations nationwide. As America’s largest flight school, ATP provides more pilots to the regional airlines than any other single flight school, college, or academy.

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