Archive for the ‘Aviation Jobs’ Category

King Air First Officer Financial Assistance Opportunity

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015
KingAirLogo copylarge
King Air First Officer Financial Assistance Opportunity
Scholarship Program
Our company provides three scholarships per year of $2,000 usd for qualified applicants.  The award will be used for flight training, ground instruction, and one month of housing costs if needed.
The three scholarships consist of the following categories:
Private Pilot 
This award is for a individual having no flight time and/or aviation training.  Determination of qualified applicants will be based upon the following:
o  Be enrolled, or plan to be enrolled, for full-time study in an accredited school (community college, four year college, university, technical, etc.).  A GPA of 3.0 or higher, and minimum age of 16 years old is required to apply.
o  Have demonstrated or expressed a genuine interest in a career in aviation.  Provide examples of membership in aviation clubs, activities, or involvement in professional aviation organizations.
 Instrument Pilot
o  Be enrolled, or plan to be enrolled, for full-time study in an accredited school (community college, four year college, university, technical, etc.).  A GPA of 3.0 or higher, and minimum age of 16 years old is required to apply.
o  Have completed the Private Pilot Rating.
o  Provide letters of recommendation from Flight Schools, Certified Flight Instructors that have provided instruction leading to the Private Pilot Rating
o  Provide copies of flight log books showing flight experience.
Professional Pilot
o  Be enrolled, or plan to be enrolled, for full-time study in an accredited school (community college, four year college, university, technical, etc.).  A GPA of 3.0 or higher, and minimum age of 16 years old is required to apply.
o  Have completed the Private Pilot Rating, and Instrument Pilot Rating.
o  Provide letters of recommendation from Flight Schools, and Certified Flight Instructors that have provided instruction leading to the Private Pilot and/or Instrument Rating.
o  Provide copies of flight log books showing flight experience.

KinglogoHow to Apply

We offer a total of three scholarships per year, one scholarship for each category of training.  Since the training dates for each of these categories will vary depending upon the schedule of the applicants selected, we will accept applications at any time during the year.

Selection Criteria
Selection will be based on the applicant’s Scholarship Entry Form and Essay:  Interest in becoming a professional pilot and/or pursuing a career in aviation;  extra-curricular activities;  recommendations of teachers, flight instructors, and/or other references provided by the applicant;  and academic record.  The top five (5) candidates may be called for a personal interview via Skype or Facetime when the next scholarship comes available.
Application Process
1.  Prepare a 500 word essay regarding your desire to pursue a career in aviation, and the steps that you have taken to reach this goal.
2.  Provide certified copies of all high school, technical, trade, vocational, and/or colleges attended.  Be sure that all grades are reflected along with the GPA (Grade Point Average).
3.  Three letters of recommendations from people you know you well.
4.  Please submit your interest at:  www.aviationschoolsonline.com
Please advise which scholarship your application is for as well as your contact information.
Notices
The award of this scholarship does not cover the costs of obtaining TSA approval and/or obtaining a student visa if you are a not a citizen of the United States.  These expenses must be paid before the scholarship can be used.
Successful applicants have three months (3) to use the scholarship from the date of the award.  If the scholarship is not used within the three months after it is awarded the scholarship shall be forfeited and given to the next successful applicant.

Privacy Policy

All information collected from applicants will be retained for one year, and will ONLY be used to determine eligibility for scholarships.  No information will be released and/or shared with any other entities.  Any student information can only be shared if students give their permission and for the purpose of awarding scholarships.  No students will be automatically enrolled to receive extraneous emails and/or solicitations of any sort.  Students will only receive further communication regarding their individual application, and no information will be shared for email distribution lists.

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Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians – Bureau of Labor Statistics

aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians image

Airframe mechanics can work on many aircraft electrical systems.
Quick Facts: Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians
2012 Median Pay $55,230 per year
$26.55 per hour
Entry-Level Education See How to Become One
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2012 138,900
Job Outlook, 2012-22 2% (Little or no change)
Employment Change, 2012-22 3,500

What Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians Do

Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians repair and perform scheduled maintenance on aircraft. They also may perform aircraft inspections as required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Work Environment

Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians work in hangars, in repair stations, or on airfields. They must often meet strict deadlines to maintain flight schedules. The environment can be loud because of aircraft engines and equipment. Workers frequently bend, stoop, and reach from ladders and scaffolds. Most mechanics and technicians work full time; overtime and weekend work is common.

How to Become an Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanic or Technician

Most aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians learn their trade at an FAA-approved Aviation Maintenance Technician School. Others enter with a high school education or equivalent and are trained on the job. Some workers enter the occupation after receiving training in the military. Aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians are typically certified by the FAA.

Pay

In May 2012, the median annual wage for aircraft mechanics and service technicians was $55,210. The median annual wage for avionics technicians was $55,350 in May 2012.

Job Outlook

Employment of aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians is projected to show little or no change from 2012 to 2022. Job prospects will be best for mechanics who hold an Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) certificate.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

http://www.bls.gov/home.htm

SUGGESTED CITATION:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians,
on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm (visited January 29, 2015).

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“UAV Pilot Training: 5 Things to consider”

Monday, January 26th, 2015

UAV Pilot Training

Five Things to consider

UAV pilot training is becoming an increasingly popular flight training option. Still in the early phases of development, the UAV industry is an exciting industry to follow, but one that is often difficult to understand and often breeds misconceptions. If you’re interested in UAVs and UAV pilot training, you should consider several things before starting your training.

UAV pilot training is all new

Modern UAVs are so much more than glorified remote control planes. They are in a near constant state of development, with new models rapidly out pacing the capabilities of models of just a few years ago. Not to mention, the FAA has struggled to keep pace with regard to establishing a framework to govern UAV pilot certification. The end result is that UAV pilot training is all new and changes a lot. Those interested in UAV pilot training would do well to follow the FAA’s UAS Integration initiative (http://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/uas/).

UAV pilot training might not be available to you

Due in part to its newness, UAV pilot training isn’t yet widely available. New training providers are regularly starting courses in anticipation of the FAA developing a real UAS pilot certificate, but training is still likely to require a bit of travel on your part. Many of the best training providers are also heavily involved in UAV research in general, including several colleges an universities who recently sponsored test site proposals. As such, you might also need to be accepted to that college or university in general before being able to actually enroll in UAV pilot training.

Learning to fly UAVs isn’t any easier than regular flight training

The only real difference in flying a UAV and flying a more conventional aircraft is the location of the pilot. It is a common misconception that flying UAVs is some how less difficult than regular flying, but this is simply not accurate. If anything, flying a UAV is more difficult due to the lack of physical sensations of motion. In either case, learning to fly UAVs requires the same understanding of scientific and technical principles of flight as any flight training program.

UAV flight training is rapidly changing

As the FAA progresses through the process of integrating UAS into the National Airspace System, they continue to develop best practices and guidelines for training that will provide the basis for the UAV pilot certification process. While there are currently no UAV pilot certificates, it is only reasonable to expect at least a commercial certification to be developed and required in order to operate a UAV. Until such a time as that certification becomes available, it is likely there will be numerous changes and developments to cope with.

UAV pilot training is for the future

It is most important to understand that, unlike helicopter flight training for example, UAV pilot training is for the future. It is certainly not the distant future, but you can’t exactly walk out of a UAV pilot training program into a nice 9 to 5 job flying remotely-piloted aircraft. Please don’t let that stop you from pursuing UAV pilot training, but do be aware that you’re developing skills for the future in a fascinating and innovative career field.

UAV pilot training is experiencing rapid growth and provides the skills of the future. Blended with a current flight training program for more conventional aircraft, you are not only setting the stage for an exciting career today, but you will provide the basis for a very exciting and lucrative future career that will be not only exceptionally interesting but very rewarding.

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GI Bill: Education for Veterans Including Careers in Aviation!

Monday, January 26th, 2015

Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits:

If you are interested in a career in aviation and you are a Veteran, now is the time to take advantage of the Post 9/11 GI Bill to further your education! The PostGI Bill Careers in Aviation 9/11 GI Bill was put into effect in 2008 to provide education benefits for Veterans who have served on active duty for 90 or more days since Sept. 10, 2001. The VA-administered program provides benefits that are tiered based on the number of days served on active duty.  For approved members, the Post-9/11 GI Bill provides up to 36 months of education benefits, generally payable for 15 years following your release from active duty and can include:

  • Up to 100% Tuition and Fee Coverage
  • A Monthly Living (Housing) Stipend
  • Up to $1000 a year for Books and Supplies
  • A One Time Relocation Allowance
  • The Option to Transfer Benefits to Family MembersPost 9/11 GI Bill Benefit Chart

Types of Training Covered:

The following educational benefits are approved under the Post 9/11 GI Bill:

  • College degree programs including Associate, Bachelor, and advanced degree programs
  • Vocational/Technical Training including non-college degree programs
  • On-the-job/Apprenticeship Training
  • Licensing & Certification Training
  • National Testing Programs such as SAT, CLEP, AP, etc
  • Flight Training
  • Correspondence Training
  • Entrepreneurship Training
  • Work-study programs

In conjunction with the Post 9/11 GI Bill, there is the Yellow Ribbon Program, which can add additional financial help to the GI Bill benefits for qualifying Veterans. You can also transfer your benefits to your spouse or dependents! Take advantage of this great opportunity you have earned by serving your country. Once the VA has received your application they will determine your eligibility for the Post-9/11 GI Bill and you will be on your way to a new career…. possibly in AVIATION!

To apply for Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits: VA Form 22-1990.

More info:

VA Post 9/11 GI Benefits: http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/post911_gibill.asp

Yellow Ribbon Program:  http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/yellow_ribbon.asp

Flight Training under the GI Bill:  http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/flight_training.asp

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How you can become a professional career pilot

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

How you can become a professional career pilot

aircraft sales aircraft maintenance aerial videography

World needs pilots! Record growth leads to record need Half a million pilots needed globally.

CNN – Feb 13, 2014 - ”Released in August 2013, the Boeing Pilot and Technical Market Outlook for 2013-2032 forecasts nearly half a million new commercial airline pilots will be needed to fly all the new airplanes entering the world fleet over the next 20 years.”

ROTOR F/X is presenting a series of seminars to show you how you can become a professional career pilot in the airlines, corporate business and charter or helicopters and enter the exciting and rewarding world of aviation.

If you have ever dreamed of being a pilot and making it your career be sure to come and hear first hand from experienced pilots and instructors what is in store for you.
The seminars and presentations will cover:

  • All aspects of training and ratings from private pilot through ATP (Airline Transport Pilot)
  • Earning a two or four year university degree in aviation along with your flight training
  • Financing options for flight training
  • Financing options for university degree programs including special low interest government backed student loans
  • Job opportunities in all fields, now and in the near future
  • How you can have a guaranteed job working with us

Do not miss this opportunity to change your life and learn how to enter the fascinating and exciting world of flight.

Also included in the experience will be:

  • Aircraft displays – both airplane and helicopter
  • Aviation literature and films
  • Free 6 month subscription to “Flight Training Magazine” for all registered attendees
  • Flight tours and demonstration lessons both days at a special discount
  • Job opportunities in all fields, now and in the near future
  • FREE first lesson voucher for all signees on seminar dates

RECENT ARTICLES on “Pilot Shortage”

World needs pilots! Record growth leads to record need

- businessaircraftcenter.com

Pilot Shortage Looms, Boeing Report Says

- flyingmag.com

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Aviation Maintenance Technology Program has impact on San Joaquin Valley College (SJVC) Students

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

 

SJVCFresno-Aircraft-Maintenance-instructor-Don-Dutra1

Aviation Maintenance  Technology Program has impact on San Joaquin Valley College SJVC Students

As an instructor for  San Joaquin Valley College’s (SJVC) Aviation Maintenance Technology (AMT) program, Don Dutra has seen every type of student join his Powerplant class. Those eager faces fresh out of high school, career-change seekers, and close-to-retirement adventurers who are finally fulfilling a dream, stare back at him. Aviation Maintenance  Technology Program has impact on SJVC Students.

“We get some students with zero experience and those who have been in the job market for awhile,” says Mr. Dutra.

No matter what their work background or experience level, the AMT program will have a positive impact. “Even when a student has not really decided that this is the right course for them, it is important that they keep working toward completion; not giving up,” says Dutra. “Maybe for the first time, they learned to finish what they started and to become good at something.”

What seems to be an obstacle to their success, if overcome, “helps graduates to become good employees – no matter what the field – and good civilians,” as Dutra calls it. “Many happy parents and spouses are grateful they finished and look forward to the next chapter.”

And, then there is the ‘natural,’ that person who was born to fly…or keep things flying.

“That student is motivated by being around aircraft; seeing all the different aspects of aviation,” says Dutra, whose program is located at Fresno-Yosemite National airport where students can look out on the runway and see aircraft take off and land daily.

“They don’t get bored seeing that, and they know that one day they’re going to be turning wrenches on similar aircraft,” Don says.

Mr. Dutra’s Powerplant class provides instruction in all facets of aircraft engines. Students are up to their shoulders in huge engines of all imaginable aircraft in the campus’ expansive hangar.

Don describes his teaching style as more ‘coaching’ than professorial. “I like to let my students learn from their own mistakes and then briefly explain what went right and what went wrong,” he says. “A belly flop makes a better point and they retain the information long-term.”

Don Dutra spent some of his 23-years as a Navy jet mechanic teaching ‘mechanics school’ to Navy and Marine recruits. After separation from the military he decided to get the formal education necessary to continue a career as an educator.

He earned his A.S. and B.A. degrees while going to school at night and working full-time for SJVC. He took the FAA exam to get his Inspector Authorization license. Don’s experience allowed him to bypass additional training for the test. He passed on his first try.

“Airframe and Powerplant certified mechanics with an IA endorsement is about the highest honor mechanics can achieve in their career,” says Jason Alves, Academic Dean.

During these years of balancing work, school, homework and home-life with his wife, Mary, Don lived the spread-thin life many of his students experience today. He can tell them first-hand that the end result is worth it.

“I am the very first person in my family to ever earn a college degree,” he says having grown up in Fresno in a family of eleven. But, he had good role models. “My mom worked hard her whole life, and my dad was a junk man who spent his life buying and selling cars, which is where I got my interest in engines.”

Don wants to make sure that his students get every bit of life and career experience he has to give them.

“I want our students to walk away with something that serves them in long-term employment and, hopefully, happiness,” he says. “When they walk away with their license, we know they’ve accomplished what they came here for and we’ve done what we are supposed to do.”

Judging from a long line of grads that stop by the campus, the successes are self-evident. Their claims of “I couldn’t have done it without you,” and “I am amazed and surprised at how much we learn here and apply on the job,” reinforce Don’s confidence in what the AMT program provides.

Toward this end, Don likes to plant seeds of wisdom and offer a little inspiration that might help his students get there from here.

“I tell them that there will always be the stories about the pilot who saved the day or landed the plane safely,” he says. “But, what you never hear about is the mechanic. It’s the mechanic – you – who puts that plane in the air; and it’s only going to stay there if you do your job right.”

Don’s words make a nice landing.

For more information on San Joaquin Valley College / Fresno Aviation please click on the following link to inquire about becoming an Aviation Technician:

http://www.aviationschoolsonline.com/school-info/San-Joaquin-Valley-College-AMT-Program/1253/3032/F/2.php

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PIA Instructor Receives Statewide Recognition

Monday, November 10th, 2014

PIA Vector Logo big- Plane

PIA Instructor Receives Statewide Recognition  

September 26, 2014 (Pittsburgh, PA) – The Aviation Council of Pennsylvania (ACP) recognized Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics (PIA) Instructor Dave Koehler as the recipient of their 2014 Education Award. The award was bestowed on Koehler for his work with PIA’s courses on Aircraft Instruments and Controls. Koehler, a PIA graduate and 14 year veteran of the instructional staff, was grateful for the acknowledgment. “I’m honored and flattered to even be nominated,” Koehler said. “It’s quite humbling to be recognized for my efforts.” Koehler brings a wide range of experience to the classroom, including work as a maintenance controller and quality control management. He constantly updates his teaching materials to reflect the latest advancements in the field of aviation. Many of Koehler’s pupils affirm the ACP’s selection, describing him as enthusiastic, knowledgeable and passionate. Koehler appreciates watching his students grow during their time at PIA. “I enjoy attending graduation and seeing the changes my students have undergone since going through my class,” Koehler said. The ACP also selected Corey Staley, a student at the Hagerstown Branch Campus, for their Aviation Technology Scholarship. The ACP focuses on improving and promoting aviation in both the government and private sector while increasing public awareness of aviation and aerospace. PIA President John Graham III serves as a member of the ACP Board of Directors. About Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics The school was opened by Glenn Curtiss and Orville Wright in 1927 as Curtiss-Wright Flying Service, and became PIA in 1929. PIA offers “hands-on” training for traditional and non- traditional students in Aviation Maintenance and Aviation Electronics. The instructional staff combine real world experience with class room instruction for an outstanding education. PIA also provides a wide range of student services while the student is in school, and after graduation.  The Career Services Department works one on one with students to reach their employment goals. PIA is often the first stop for many employers looking for quality employees. PIA offers an Associate in Specialized Technology Degree at its West Mifflin, PA location and Diploma programs in Youngstown, OH, Hagerstown, MD, and Myrtle Beach, SC.  There is open enrollment through the year accompanied with admissions requirements.   

For more information on Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics, Flight Schools, and Flight Instructor Jobs click: http://www.aviationschoolsonline.com/

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What are “quality” flight hours?

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

Soon after getting your flight certificates and ratings you will want to start building up flight time.  If flying is a hobby, getting quality flight time will not only be fun, but it will make you a safer pilot.  If being a professional pilot and flying for a living is your dream, logging quality time is not an option, it’s a necessity.
But, what is “quality flight time”?  Consider Silvia and Nelson, both have just finished their flight training and are anxious to start getting paid to fly in hopes of becoming airline pilots one day.
Nelson marches himself to the local airport and applies for a sight seeing pilot position.  He gets the job and is soon taking passengers on sight seeing tours in a Cessna 182 showing them the majestic beauty of the Grand Canyon and area around it.
Silvia, on the other hand, starts flight instructing at her local flight school and soon has a couple of private pilot students and an instrument student.
Nelson logs almost 600 hours his first year!  Silvia only logs 430 hours.  Who has the most fight time?  And, more important, who has the most “quality flight time”?
While Nelson may have more hours in his logbook, most, if not all, of that flight time is VFR (Visual Flight Rules) day time.  Nelson probably hasn’t flown in instrument conditions very much (conditions in which you have no reference to an outside horizon and you have to fly and navigate with reference to the airplane’s instruments only).  Nelson also has little night time in his logbook.
Silvia has less total time, but her pilot skills are as sharp as they’ll ever be – student pilots tend to ask tough questions, keep you on your toes, and really test your abilities as a pilot.  Instrument students (students working on their Instrument rating) have kept Silvia’s instrument skills razor sharp.  She’s also been able to log a decent amount of cross country time and night time.
The point is, as in other aspects of life, you should concentrate on Quality as much, if not more so, than Quantity.  Employers hiring pilots know (or should know) the difference between someone who’s logged a lot of VFR day time versus someone who’s been willing to stretch outside their comfort zones in order to keep learning, improve their piloting skills, and really grow as a pilot.
Some of the best lessons I’ve learned as a pilot have come from flight instructing private pilot students or flying as a ferry pilot.  These experiences are priceless, but it required a commitment to seek out opportunities that would require stepping outside my comfort zone.  As a result, I can often hold my own when talking to pilots with a lot more flight time than I, but without as many interesting experiences.
Now, don’t get me wrong, any time you get an opportunity to fly (even as a sight seeing pilot), take it!  VFR day time is still better than no time.  But, make sure you continue to learn and grow as a pilot by seeking out opportunities that stretch your boundaries.
Here are 6 ideas to do just that:
1. If you’re a CFII, take on a good balance of primary and advanced students
Primary students will keep you on your toes and, since they can’t fly yet, will allow you to demonstrate many of the maneuvers before they can do it themselves.  Being a CFI, in and of itself, is a great way to stay sharp as pilot, be sure to check out the FAA handbook for flight instructors on the FAA website (http://www.faa.gov)
2. Attend FAA Safety Seminars
In addition to getting free information to keep you safe and legal, these are great opportunities to network with pilots in your area.  You never know who you might meet.  To sign up for these FREE seminars, visit the Flight Safety website (http://www.faasafety.gov).
3. Join an organization and do some x/c flying
Many airports are home to flying clubs or other flying organizations that will offer you the opportunity to participate on fly-ins and other adventures.  A great way to meet other pilots and gain from their expertise.  Social Flight (http://www.socialflight.com) is a great site that will keep you updated about flying activities in your area. (Social Flite)
4. Participate in a race
There are several air races throughout the year.  Even if you don’t own an airplane, you could join a team and become a involved in a race as a supporting member.  The Air Race Classic (http://www.airraceclassic.org) is one example of a fun race that happens annually.
5. Get an additional endorsement or get checked out in a different aircraft
Flying as many types of airplanes as you can is a great way to gain an indescribable type of experience.  It helps you become more in touch with the machines that you operate as your body and senses start discerning all the different nuances of different aircraft.  For example, the lessons I learned when earning my tailwheel endorsement translated to making me a much better pilot in any airplane I get to fly.
6. Offer to ferry airplanes
When I was building up flight time, ferrying was the bets way to do it fast!  You really have to be on top of your game, since you will be flying unfamiliar airplanes whose history you don’t know much about.  You’ll be flying over unfamiliar terrain, into and out of unfamiliar airports, and it’s almost a given that you’ll run into un-forcasted weather or unplanned mechanical issues.  Visit PilotTricks.com to read about my own ferrying adventures.
In conclusion, make sure to keep you skills sharp, always look for opportunities to learn and, of course, stay safe!
For more ideas on building “quality” flight time, visit: http://www.pilottricks.com/when-it-comes-to-flight-time-is-quality-better-than-quantity

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What should I study to become a pilot?

Saturday, May 31st, 2014

photo by PilotTricks.com

photo by PilotTricks.com

The question comes up over and over, “I’m not good at math, but I want to be a pilot, what should I study in college?”
There is no right or wrong answer to this question…at least not in the sense that you might be thinking.  Perhaps because the question itself is flawed.  The real question should be, “How am I going to go about making my dreams a reality?”

 

Answering this question is going to take some soul searching.  First you have to determine what your dreams are.  Then, you have to determine what the steps are to achieving your dreams.  And the most important step, of course, is to start taking action.

Let’s go through this step by step:

1. What are you passionate about?

If you think you might be passionate about flying, you need to get specific and clear on what your ultimate goal is.  In other words, what type of pilot do you want to be and why?

If “money” or “status” are high on the list of reasons why you want to fly – you need to do some more soul searching.  Passion lies beyond material things – it’s something that you would do even if you didn’t get paid for it. The type of flying is also important – airline flying, for instance is different than corporate flying, different than military type flying, different than cargo flying, etc.  Find out what type of flying would suit you best.

2. Depending on the type of career you want, you now have to figure out a road map to get there.

Find companies offering the types of career you want or individuals who already have the type job you want.  Figure out what the requirements are.  College degree? Any special certifications?  For instance, most airlines require a college degree – they don’t specify what type of degree.  This is probably due to the fact that today’s aircraft are so sophisticated that they do most of the work for you.  If you can add, subtract, multiply, and divide, you have the required math skills required to be an airline pilot.

Other type of pilot careers may require more advanced degrees, e.g. Test Pilots usually have engineering degrees.

3. Take massive action.

Once you know the requirements, find out where get them.  Research schools, talk to others who have already achieved some level of success, and then act.  If you’re still not sure what to choose as a field of study in college, check out this article that will give you plenty of ideas.

Article Author: Ruth Morlas is dedicated to helping others reach their dream of becoming a pilot.  For more information visit http://www.PilotTricks.com.

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Business Ideas For Commercial Pilots

Saturday, May 11th, 2013

business ideas for commercial pilots - Cessna Caravan

The Cessna Grand Caravan is popular with aerial tour operators

Good pilot jobs in today’s economy have become harder and harder to find. Landing a major airline job is difficult and applicants face lots of competitors who have been waiting in line a long time for each opening. Many new pilots have to settle for low paying entry level jobs and sometimes even need to find additional non-aviation jobs to pay the bills. Some wonder if there is anything they can do to build a profitable business in the aviation industry. There are many options available to the commercial pilot who is willing to put in some capital and a little risk. Here’s a few business ideas for commercial pilots.

Charters, Tour Operators, and More

One option in pursuing a business is to purchase your own planes and provide chartered flights for business, individuals, or celebrities. There are some businesses or executives that will hire one charter business to be their permanent carrier. With time and marketing, the number of clients looking to hire you could grow. Other pilots might start a tour business flying over scenic locations. With an aircraft, or a fleet of aircraft, there are many other options that can be pursued which include air taxi, agricultural spraying, flight instruction, emergency search and rescue, etc.

Banner Towing

Marketers out there still love to hire pilots to tow banners in front of large crowds of people or during events. Typically these pilots fly low and slow in a single engine airplane. Banner towing is a great way to build up hours to transition into agricultural flying as well. Towing a banner does require some extra skill especially when taking off and landing the aircraft.

Aerial Photography

The advancement of cameras combined with social media on the Internet has created the opportunity for many amateur and professional photographers to make a living in aviation. Pilots can either work for hire or can do their own photography/videography from the air.

Even though times are tough as a pilot there are options for the spirited entrepreneur. Whether you invest funds and time into a charter business, banner towing, aerial photography, or many other options, there are those waiting for your services and expertise.

As an author, Jordan McPelt writes about various subject matter including aircraft, pilots, business, airport safety, and low profile airport barricades. Learn more about airport safety and airport barricades at trans-supply.com.

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