Archive for the ‘Aviation Jobs’ Category

FAA Allows Commercial Operation for the Black Hawk Helicopter

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015

800px-Blackhawk

The Black Hawk Helicopter’s Role in Military

The Black Hawk helicopter was designed by Sikorsky in the early 70’s to replace the army’s UH-1 Huey. It began to be utilized in 1979, and is still a vital component of military operations. It’s effectiveness for transport of troops, search and rescue, Special Operations and other battlefield assignments has made it a very necessary part of our military’s arsenal, and should be a part for the next few years. However, according to the National Defense Magazine, “the helicopter designs used by the various military branches are at least 30-50 years old.” The Apache attack helicopters and the Sikorsky Black Hawks have both been in use for around 40 years. Because of this, the Army has instituted a plan they call “Future Vertical Lift”, which will include up to four new helicopter models over the span of the next 20 years. One of the proposed replacements is what the Army calls a “ultra” helo that will be so large that it can carry off missions that only the fixed-wing C-130 transport plane can handle.

The New FAA Regulation

Now, with the Black Hawk facing a phase-out based on the plans for new models in the future, it seems that the circumstances may have laid the groundwork for the FAA issuing what is called a “groundbreaking new regulation” pertaining to the commercial operations of the Black Hawk. This restricted-category type certification to (Black Hawk) helicopters will allow commercial operations of the Sikorsky UH-60A for firefighting and other special operations such as aerial crane, contruction and film production. Now, more than the 60 UH-60A recently sold by the U.S. Army, can be used for commercial purposes. Firehawk Helicopters first obtained approval for this certification. This is the first certificate of its kind to be given to a privately-held company. Now, Firehawk Helicopters, Brown Helicopter, and Dynamic Aviation either have or have available for purchase 40 plus UH-60/S-70‘s.

Commercial Uses

The Black Hawk can now be used in multiple commercial scenarios, but one is probably not needed more that its firefighting capabilities. Typically, in a firefighting mission, the smaller helicopters are first on the scene; then, the “heavy lifters” such as the Firehawk Black Hawks are sent in to fight the largest, most threatening fires. The big Black Hawks can safely carry huge 900-gallon buckets, and have cruising speeds of 160-200 MPH, which enables it to access the fire quickly. As the demands of the private sector increase in the areas of border patrol, law enforcement and emergency services, and the increasing needs created by natural disasters (such as Hurricane Katrina), more non-military helicopters such as the Black Hawk, can now be made available.

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The Economic Benefits of Aviation!

Thursday, April 9th, 2015

Aviation is the Most Important Transportation of our Time     

Orville and Wilbur Wright had absolutely no idea that they had invented the most important means of transportation for our time. More than a hundred years later, we use our skies to transport thousands of people and goods to their destinations every day. Incredibly, commercial air travel is the safest way to travel statistically; it’s safer than driving, going by train, and even walking.  Aviation presented our society with wonderful potential and we seized it and grew. We know that if the world can come to your city through aviation, the economic benefits are enormous.

A Closer Look: Dallas, Texas: One City with Two Airports

Taking a closer look at the economic benefits of aviation, we will focus on Dallas, Texas. A city with two airports: Love Field and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. For years the Wright Amendment of 1979 restricted air travel in North Texas and severely limited the potential of Dallas’s city airport, Love Field, which was thought to be unable to handle increased air traffic. Instead, The Federal Aviation Administration promoted a more removed regional airport, which we know as Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.  The amendment prevented regular commercial aircraft at Love Field from flying anywhere except in Texas and its neighboring states. DFW International grew to be a huge hub for airlines, holding 155 gates and serving 204 destinations around the world. The effects of this airport since its opening in the 70’s have been simply tremendous growth in the North Texas region.

Change is in the Air

On October 13, 2014, the Wright Amendment of 1979 was repealed, and airlines were now able to fly from Love Field to any destination in America! Now we are beginning to see the potential of a large airport operating centrally located in this city. This time we will witness the effects of an airport on a more precise scale and a smaller area—Dallas’s urban area. Love Field is growing. Southwest Airlines is adding more destinations from Love Field and in January they recorded a 47.6 percent increase in passenger travel at the airport. Those are staggering numbers for an increase in circulation, both in terms of financial capital and passengers plainly traveling through the airport.

Huge Economic Benefit for Dallas

So what does this mean for Dallas? It will no doubt mean a huge economic benefit for the city. More jobs at the airport generate more disposable income for the workers and more money circulating in Dallas’s economy. Besides the new jobs created at the airport, its optimal location will bring thousands of new visitors to Dallas for both business and leisure. Now people going to Dallas’s central business district will choose the closer location, as DFW is significantly farther. The visitors flying in will enjoy restaurants and stay in hotels, and the tourism directly benefits the area. But even better, injecting the city’s market with so many exogenous purchases will precipitate the multiplier effect, a key component of Keynesian economics. Initial spending leads to increased consumption spending and endogenous transactions within the city resulting in a multiplied outcome for the overall gross domestic product (GDP) of the area. More transactions are taking place at an increasing rate and the aggregate demand will significantly increase—yielding economic growth that is extremely beneficial for the community.

The Economic Benefits of Aviation Worldwide

Just like this recent change for Dallas’s Love Field is a huge economic infusion, aviation is creating economic growth worldwide. According to Images NASA - routes of air navigation in EuropaBoeing’s current market outlook for 2015: “As aviation continues to become an integral part of life, it is bringing people closer together. As emerging markets continue to grow and new business models expand, airplane manufacturers are seeing greater geographical diversity in their customer base. In 1993, more than 73 percent of all traffic was carried by airlines in Europe or North America. By 2033, that proportion will shrink to 38 percent. Asia Pacific and Middle East airlines are becoming prominent in global aviation. The low-cost business model is becoming a viable option in emerging markets, offering consumers access to a wider range of destinations and the opportunity to choose the speed and convenience of flying over traditional modes of transportation. In addition, modern twin-aisle airplanes enable smaller operators in developing economies to compete on longer routes traditionally dominated by foreign carriers. Rapidly evolving aviation services in these regions are broadening the geographical balance of airplane demand, spurring a worldwide requirement for 36,770 new jet airplanes, valued at $5.2 trillion.” Besides the huge impact this growth has for major companies like Boeing, cities worldwide will feel the economic benefit both directly and indirectly as the world becomes more connected through aviation!

(source:http://www.boeing.com/commercial/market/long-term-market/world-regions/)

 

 

 

 

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Aviation School Awarded FAA’s Elite Diamond Award of Excellence

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

 

AIM

INDIANAPOLIS, IN (02/12/15) – Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s (AIM) Indianapolis campus is the proud recipient of the prestigious 2014 Diamond Award of Excellence from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Maintenance Technician Awards Program. This marks 11th consecutive year that AIM Indianapolis has received this award.

The program began as a way for the FAA to encourage Aircraft Maintenance Technicians (AMTs) and employers to participate aggressively in available initial and recurrent maintenance training. Through the AMT Awards Program, the FAA recognizes eligible Technicians and employers by issuing awards to those who receive or promote and foster initial and recurrent training.

“I am very proud of the education department for their dedication to ongoing training that they have to do for us to continue to earn this award,” says Andy Duncan, Campus Executive Director.

In order to achieve the Diamond Award of Excellence, 100% of the campus’s Airframe & Powerplant Mechanics instructors must receive an individual Aviation Maintenance Technician (AMT) Award in the FAA AMT Awards Program. To receive an individual AMT Award, a Technician must complete a minimum of 12 hours of training during the year, including a two hour course conducted through the FAA website. The instructors are also required to log their training on the FAA website and claim their individual award within a specified time frame.  The Diamond Award is the highest award granted by the FAA for aviation maintenance technicians and their employers.

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

AIM –Indianapolis campus is part of the nation’s largest family of aviation maintenance schools, with headquarters in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Students learn the skills necessary to become successful in one of the world’s fastest growing industries, aviation maintenance.  AIM graduates are there to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers.  AIM’s other campuses are located in Duluth, Georgia; Chesapeake, Virginia; Irving, Texas; Houston, Texas; Kansas City, Missouri; Las Vegas, Nevada; Manassas, Virginia; Oakland, California; Casselberry, Florida and Pennsylvania.  Learn more at: www.aviationmaintenance.edu. Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AIMIndianapolis.

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King Air First Officer Financial Assistance Opportunity

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015
KingAirLogo copylarge
King Air First Officer Financial Assistance Opportunity
Scholarship Program
Our company provides three scholarships per year of $2,000 usd for qualified applicants.  The award will be used for flight training, ground instruction, and one month of housing costs if needed.
The three scholarships consist of the following categories:
Private Pilot 
This award is for a individual having no flight time and/or aviation training.  Determination of qualified applicants will be based upon the following:
o  Be enrolled, or plan to be enrolled, for full-time study in an accredited school (community college, four year college, university, technical, etc.).  A GPA of 3.0 or higher, and minimum age of 16 years old is required to apply.
o  Have demonstrated or expressed a genuine interest in a career in aviation.  Provide examples of membership in aviation clubs, activities, or involvement in professional aviation organizations.
 Instrument Pilot
o  Be enrolled, or plan to be enrolled, for full-time study in an accredited school (community college, four year college, university, technical, etc.).  A GPA of 3.0 or higher, and minimum age of 16 years old is required to apply.
o  Have completed the Private Pilot Rating.
o  Provide letters of recommendation from Flight Schools, Certified Flight Instructors that have provided instruction leading to the Private Pilot Rating
o  Provide copies of flight log books showing flight experience.
Professional Pilot
o  Be enrolled, or plan to be enrolled, for full-time study in an accredited school (community college, four year college, university, technical, etc.).  A GPA of 3.0 or higher, and minimum age of 16 years old is required to apply.
o  Have completed the Private Pilot Rating, and Instrument Pilot Rating.
o  Provide letters of recommendation from Flight Schools, and Certified Flight Instructors that have provided instruction leading to the Private Pilot and/or Instrument Rating.
o  Provide copies of flight log books showing flight experience.

KinglogoHow to Apply

We offer a total of three scholarships per year, one scholarship for each category of training.  Since the training dates for each of these categories will vary depending upon the schedule of the applicants selected, we will accept applications at any time during the year.

Selection Criteria
Selection will be based on the applicant’s Scholarship Entry Form and Essay:  Interest in becoming a professional pilot and/or pursuing a career in aviation;  extra-curricular activities;  recommendations of teachers, flight instructors, and/or other references provided by the applicant;  and academic record.  The top five (5) candidates may be called for a personal interview via Skype or Facetime when the next scholarship comes available.
Application Process
1.  Prepare a 500 word essay regarding your desire to pursue a career in aviation, and the steps that you have taken to reach this goal.
2.  Provide certified copies of all high school, technical, trade, vocational, and/or colleges attended.  Be sure that all grades are reflected along with the GPA (Grade Point Average).
3.  Three letters of recommendations from people you know you well.
4.  Please submit your interest at:  www.aviationschoolsonline.com
Please advise which scholarship your application is for as well as your contact information.
Notices
The award of this scholarship does not cover the costs of obtaining TSA approval and/or obtaining a student visa if you are a not a citizen of the United States.  These expenses must be paid before the scholarship can be used.
Successful applicants have three months (3) to use the scholarship from the date of the award.  If the scholarship is not used within the three months after it is awarded the scholarship shall be forfeited and given to the next successful applicant.

Privacy Policy

All information collected from applicants will be retained for one year, and will ONLY be used to determine eligibility for scholarships.  No information will be released and/or shared with any other entities.  Any student information can only be shared if students give their permission and for the purpose of awarding scholarships.  No students will be automatically enrolled to receive extraneous emails and/or solicitations of any sort.  Students will only receive further communication regarding their individual application, and no information will be shared for email distribution lists.

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Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians – Bureau of Labor Statistics

aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians image

Airframe mechanics can work on many aircraft electrical systems.
Quick Facts: Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians
2012 Median Pay $55,230 per year
$26.55 per hour
Entry-Level Education See How to Become One
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2012 138,900
Job Outlook, 2012-22 2% (Little or no change)
Employment Change, 2012-22 3,500

What Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians Do

Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians repair and perform scheduled maintenance on aircraft. They also may perform aircraft inspections as required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Work Environment

Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians work in hangars, in repair stations, or on airfields. They must often meet strict deadlines to maintain flight schedules. The environment can be loud because of aircraft engines and equipment. Workers frequently bend, stoop, and reach from ladders and scaffolds. Most mechanics and technicians work full time; overtime and weekend work is common.

How to Become an Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanic or Technician

Most aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians learn their trade at an FAA-approved Aviation Maintenance Technician School. Others enter with a high school education or equivalent and are trained on the job. Some workers enter the occupation after receiving training in the military. Aircraft mechanics and avionics technicians are typically certified by the FAA.

Pay

In May 2012, the median annual wage for aircraft mechanics and service technicians was $55,210. The median annual wage for avionics technicians was $55,350 in May 2012.

Job Outlook

Employment of aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians is projected to show little or no change from 2012 to 2022. Job prospects will be best for mechanics who hold an Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) certificate.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

http://www.bls.gov/home.htm

SUGGESTED CITATION:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians,
on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm (visited January 29, 2015).

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“UAV Pilot Training: 5 Things to consider”

Monday, January 26th, 2015

UAV Pilot Training

Five Things to consider

UAV pilot training is becoming an increasingly popular flight training option. Still in the early phases of development, the UAV industry is an exciting industry to follow, but one that is often difficult to understand and often breeds misconceptions. If you’re interested in UAVs and UAV pilot training, you should consider several things before starting your training.

UAV pilot training is all new

Modern UAVs are so much more than glorified remote control planes. They are in a near constant state of development, with new models rapidly out pacing the capabilities of models of just a few years ago. Not to mention, the FAA has struggled to keep pace with regard to establishing a framework to govern UAV pilot certification. The end result is that UAV pilot training is all new and changes a lot. Those interested in UAV pilot training would do well to follow the FAA’s UAS Integration initiative (http://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/uas/).

UAV pilot training might not be available to you

Due in part to its newness, UAV pilot training isn’t yet widely available. New training providers are regularly starting courses in anticipation of the FAA developing a real UAS pilot certificate, but training is still likely to require a bit of travel on your part. Many of the best training providers are also heavily involved in UAV research in general, including several colleges an universities who recently sponsored test site proposals. As such, you might also need to be accepted to that college or university in general before being able to actually enroll in UAV pilot training.

Learning to fly UAVs isn’t any easier than regular flight training

The only real difference in flying a UAV and flying a more conventional aircraft is the location of the pilot. It is a common misconception that flying UAVs is some how less difficult than regular flying, but this is simply not accurate. If anything, flying a UAV is more difficult due to the lack of physical sensations of motion. In either case, learning to fly UAVs requires the same understanding of scientific and technical principles of flight as any flight training program.

UAV flight training is rapidly changing

As the FAA progresses through the process of integrating UAS into the National Airspace System, they continue to develop best practices and guidelines for training that will provide the basis for the UAV pilot certification process. While there are currently no UAV pilot certificates, it is only reasonable to expect at least a commercial certification to be developed and required in order to operate a UAV. Until such a time as that certification becomes available, it is likely there will be numerous changes and developments to cope with.

UAV pilot training is for the future

It is most important to understand that, unlike helicopter flight training for example, UAV pilot training is for the future. It is certainly not the distant future, but you can’t exactly walk out of a UAV pilot training program into a nice 9 to 5 job flying remotely-piloted aircraft. Please don’t let that stop you from pursuing UAV pilot training, but do be aware that you’re developing skills for the future in a fascinating and innovative career field.

UAV pilot training is experiencing rapid growth and provides the skills of the future. Blended with a current flight training program for more conventional aircraft, you are not only setting the stage for an exciting career today, but you will provide the basis for a very exciting and lucrative future career that will be not only exceptionally interesting but very rewarding.

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GI Bill: Education for Veterans Including Careers in Aviation!

Monday, January 26th, 2015

Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits:

If you are interested in a career in aviation and you are a Veteran, now is the time to take advantage of the Post 9/11 GI Bill to further your education! The PostGI Bill Careers in Aviation 9/11 GI Bill was put into effect in 2008 to provide education benefits for Veterans who have served on active duty for 90 or more days since Sept. 10, 2001. The VA-administered program provides benefits that are tiered based on the number of days served on active duty.  For approved members, the Post-9/11 GI Bill provides up to 36 months of education benefits, generally payable for 15 years following your release from active duty and can include:

  • Up to 100% Tuition and Fee Coverage
  • A Monthly Living (Housing) Stipend
  • Up to $1000 a year for Books and Supplies
  • A One Time Relocation Allowance
  • The Option to Transfer Benefits to Family MembersPost 9/11 GI Bill Benefit Chart

Types of Training Covered:

The following educational benefits are approved under the Post 9/11 GI Bill:

  • College degree programs including Associate, Bachelor, and advanced degree programs
  • Vocational/Technical Training including non-college degree programs
  • On-the-job/Apprenticeship Training
  • Licensing & Certification Training
  • National Testing Programs such as SAT, CLEP, AP, etc
  • Flight Training
  • Correspondence Training
  • Entrepreneurship Training
  • Work-study programs

In conjunction with the Post 9/11 GI Bill, there is the Yellow Ribbon Program, which can add additional financial help to the GI Bill benefits for qualifying Veterans. You can also transfer your benefits to your spouse or dependents! Take advantage of this great opportunity you have earned by serving your country. Once the VA has received your application they will determine your eligibility for the Post-9/11 GI Bill and you will be on your way to a new career…. possibly in AVIATION!

To apply for Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits: VA Form 22-1990.

More info:

VA Post 9/11 GI Benefits: http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/post911_gibill.asp

Yellow Ribbon Program:  http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/yellow_ribbon.asp

Flight Training under the GI Bill:  http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/flight_training.asp

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How you can become a professional career pilot

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

How you can become a professional career pilot

aircraft sales aircraft maintenance aerial videography

World needs pilots! Record growth leads to record need Half a million pilots needed globally.

CNN – Feb 13, 2014 - ”Released in August 2013, the Boeing Pilot and Technical Market Outlook for 2013-2032 forecasts nearly half a million new commercial airline pilots will be needed to fly all the new airplanes entering the world fleet over the next 20 years.”

ROTOR F/X is presenting a series of seminars to show you how you can become a professional career pilot in the airlines, corporate business and charter or helicopters and enter the exciting and rewarding world of aviation.

If you have ever dreamed of being a pilot and making it your career be sure to come and hear first hand from experienced pilots and instructors what is in store for you.
The seminars and presentations will cover:

  • All aspects of training and ratings from private pilot through ATP (Airline Transport Pilot)
  • Earning a two or four year university degree in aviation along with your flight training
  • Financing options for flight training
  • Financing options for university degree programs including special low interest government backed student loans
  • Job opportunities in all fields, now and in the near future
  • How you can have a guaranteed job working with us

Do not miss this opportunity to change your life and learn how to enter the fascinating and exciting world of flight.

Also included in the experience will be:

  • Aircraft displays – both airplane and helicopter
  • Aviation literature and films
  • Free 6 month subscription to “Flight Training Magazine” for all registered attendees
  • Flight tours and demonstration lessons both days at a special discount
  • Job opportunities in all fields, now and in the near future
  • FREE first lesson voucher for all signees on seminar dates

RECENT ARTICLES on “Pilot Shortage”

World needs pilots! Record growth leads to record need

- businessaircraftcenter.com

Pilot Shortage Looms, Boeing Report Says

- flyingmag.com

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Aviation Maintenance Technology Program has impact on San Joaquin Valley College (SJVC) Students

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

 

SJVCFresno-Aircraft-Maintenance-instructor-Don-Dutra1

Aviation Maintenance  Technology Program has impact on San Joaquin Valley College SJVC Students

As an instructor for  San Joaquin Valley College’s (SJVC) Aviation Maintenance Technology (AMT) program, Don Dutra has seen every type of student join his Powerplant class. Those eager faces fresh out of high school, career-change seekers, and close-to-retirement adventurers who are finally fulfilling a dream, stare back at him. Aviation Maintenance  Technology Program has impact on SJVC Students.

“We get some students with zero experience and those who have been in the job market for awhile,” says Mr. Dutra.

No matter what their work background or experience level, the AMT program will have a positive impact. “Even when a student has not really decided that this is the right course for them, it is important that they keep working toward completion; not giving up,” says Dutra. “Maybe for the first time, they learned to finish what they started and to become good at something.”

What seems to be an obstacle to their success, if overcome, “helps graduates to become good employees – no matter what the field – and good civilians,” as Dutra calls it. “Many happy parents and spouses are grateful they finished and look forward to the next chapter.”

And, then there is the ‘natural,’ that person who was born to fly…or keep things flying.

“That student is motivated by being around aircraft; seeing all the different aspects of aviation,” says Dutra, whose program is located at Fresno-Yosemite National airport where students can look out on the runway and see aircraft take off and land daily.

“They don’t get bored seeing that, and they know that one day they’re going to be turning wrenches on similar aircraft,” Don says.

Mr. Dutra’s Powerplant class provides instruction in all facets of aircraft engines. Students are up to their shoulders in huge engines of all imaginable aircraft in the campus’ expansive hangar.

Don describes his teaching style as more ‘coaching’ than professorial. “I like to let my students learn from their own mistakes and then briefly explain what went right and what went wrong,” he says. “A belly flop makes a better point and they retain the information long-term.”

Don Dutra spent some of his 23-years as a Navy jet mechanic teaching ‘mechanics school’ to Navy and Marine recruits. After separation from the military he decided to get the formal education necessary to continue a career as an educator.

He earned his A.S. and B.A. degrees while going to school at night and working full-time for SJVC. He took the FAA exam to get his Inspector Authorization license. Don’s experience allowed him to bypass additional training for the test. He passed on his first try.

“Airframe and Powerplant certified mechanics with an IA endorsement is about the highest honor mechanics can achieve in their career,” says Jason Alves, Academic Dean.

During these years of balancing work, school, homework and home-life with his wife, Mary, Don lived the spread-thin life many of his students experience today. He can tell them first-hand that the end result is worth it.

“I am the very first person in my family to ever earn a college degree,” he says having grown up in Fresno in a family of eleven. But, he had good role models. “My mom worked hard her whole life, and my dad was a junk man who spent his life buying and selling cars, which is where I got my interest in engines.”

Don wants to make sure that his students get every bit of life and career experience he has to give them.

“I want our students to walk away with something that serves them in long-term employment and, hopefully, happiness,” he says. “When they walk away with their license, we know they’ve accomplished what they came here for and we’ve done what we are supposed to do.”

Judging from a long line of grads that stop by the campus, the successes are self-evident. Their claims of “I couldn’t have done it without you,” and “I am amazed and surprised at how much we learn here and apply on the job,” reinforce Don’s confidence in what the AMT program provides.

Toward this end, Don likes to plant seeds of wisdom and offer a little inspiration that might help his students get there from here.

“I tell them that there will always be the stories about the pilot who saved the day or landed the plane safely,” he says. “But, what you never hear about is the mechanic. It’s the mechanic – you – who puts that plane in the air; and it’s only going to stay there if you do your job right.”

Don’s words make a nice landing.

For more information on San Joaquin Valley College / Fresno Aviation please click on the following link to inquire about becoming an Aviation Technician:

http://www.aviationschoolsonline.com/school-info/San-Joaquin-Valley-College-AMT-Program/1253/3032/F/2.php

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PIA Instructor Receives Statewide Recognition

Monday, November 10th, 2014

PIA Vector Logo big- Plane

PIA Instructor Receives Statewide Recognition  

September 26, 2014 (Pittsburgh, PA) – The Aviation Council of Pennsylvania (ACP) recognized Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics (PIA) Instructor Dave Koehler as the recipient of their 2014 Education Award. The award was bestowed on Koehler for his work with PIA’s courses on Aircraft Instruments and Controls. Koehler, a PIA graduate and 14 year veteran of the instructional staff, was grateful for the acknowledgment. “I’m honored and flattered to even be nominated,” Koehler said. “It’s quite humbling to be recognized for my efforts.” Koehler brings a wide range of experience to the classroom, including work as a maintenance controller and quality control management. He constantly updates his teaching materials to reflect the latest advancements in the field of aviation. Many of Koehler’s pupils affirm the ACP’s selection, describing him as enthusiastic, knowledgeable and passionate. Koehler appreciates watching his students grow during their time at PIA. “I enjoy attending graduation and seeing the changes my students have undergone since going through my class,” Koehler said. The ACP also selected Corey Staley, a student at the Hagerstown Branch Campus, for their Aviation Technology Scholarship. The ACP focuses on improving and promoting aviation in both the government and private sector while increasing public awareness of aviation and aerospace. PIA President John Graham III serves as a member of the ACP Board of Directors. About Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics The school was opened by Glenn Curtiss and Orville Wright in 1927 as Curtiss-Wright Flying Service, and became PIA in 1929. PIA offers “hands-on” training for traditional and non- traditional students in Aviation Maintenance and Aviation Electronics. The instructional staff combine real world experience with class room instruction for an outstanding education. PIA also provides a wide range of student services while the student is in school, and after graduation.  The Career Services Department works one on one with students to reach their employment goals. PIA is often the first stop for many employers looking for quality employees. PIA offers an Associate in Specialized Technology Degree at its West Mifflin, PA location and Diploma programs in Youngstown, OH, Hagerstown, MD, and Myrtle Beach, SC.  There is open enrollment through the year accompanied with admissions requirements.   

For more information on Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics, Flight Schools, and Flight Instructor Jobs click: http://www.aviationschoolsonline.com/

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