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Fixed Wing Pilot Jobs in Arizona

The most respected fixed-wing pilots from Arizona are able to plan their flights and ensure the airplane is safe and operable, and a lot more. Top paid fixed-wing pilots in Arizona also work to make sure the airplane's cargo has been loaded properly, and that weather conditions are safe and the aircraft's engine is running perfectly. 


Professional fixed-wing pilots looking for top-paying pilot jobs around ~regions~are expected to file flight plans with air traffic controllers and they must be able to modify flight plans in mid-flight due to the ever-changing weather conditions or aircraft performance issues.

Why do some fixed-wing pilots land all the best-paying fixed-wing pilot jobs in Arizona? Easy, they have the experience, the flight hours, they meet all the requirements, AND they are able to do takeoffs and landings and all the most difficult aspects of professional piloting (transporting people or cargo by airplane).

Most Arizona-based aviation employers hiring fixed-wing pilots for the top-paying fixed-wing pilot jobs in Arizona look for the ability to work well with others under pressure while showing the ability to coordinate and work flawlessly with copilots and flight engineers, and even flight attendants.

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The FAA and Weather

Inclement weather, including thunderstorms, snowstorms, wind shear, icing, and fog, creates potentially hazardous conditions in the nation’s airspace system. These conditions are, by far, the largest cause of flight delays. In an average year, inclement weather is the reason for nearly 70 percent of all delays. Delays translate into real costs for the airlines and the flying public. The cost to an airline for an hour of delay ranges from about $1,400 to $4,500, with the value of passenger time ranging from $35 to $63 per hour. This means that delays cost the airlines and their passengers billions of dollars each year. Each kind of inclement weather presents challenges to the FAA’s air traffic control operation, but perhaps the most disruptive are the convective storms that strike in the summer. Winter storms, while potentially dangerous, often form and move slowly. By contrast, summer storms typically form, grow and move swiftly, covering large swaths of airspace. Many start in the Ohio Valley and move east, impacting air travel in the Northeast, particularly New York. Approximately one-third of all flights in the U.S. “touch” New York, flying to or from John F. Kennedy International, LaGuardia and Newark Liberty airports, connecting with those flights or transiting New York airspace, so severe weather impacting New York has a ripple down effect over the entire country.

Fixed-Wing Aircraft Factoid Tail Wheel Gear Configuration

There are two basic configurations of airplane landing gear: conventional gear or tail wheel gear and the tricycle gear. Tail wheel gear dominated early aviation and therefore has become known as conventional gear. In addition to its two main wheels which are positioned under most of the weight of the aircraft, the conventional gear aircraft also has a smaller wheel located at the aft end of the fuselage.

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