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IFR Training Wisconsin WI

Instrument Rating Flight Training Wisconsin

The instrument rating (IFR) is something that will eventually come along if you've been flying very long. Typically, it comes up when looking at buying an aircraft or seeking a commercial pilot career, but otherwise, some pilots may take quite a while to get their instrument rating in Wisconsin. Though many pilots in Wisconsin do eventually get an instrument rating, chances are learning to fly IFR in Wisconsin now could greatly benefit your future flying.


An instrument rating will make you a better pilot, is required to get a commercial pilot certificate, and will generally lower your insurance rates. Flying on instruments in Wisconsin will make you a better pilot. When it comes to flying on instruments, precision is the keyword. There are many different things to learn for your instrument rating, but none are more difficult and rewarding as learning to fly with precision.

Once you complete your instrument rating in Wisconsin, you will be able to not only hit a specific altitude or descent rate but hold it. You will be more in control of your aircraft than you ever thought possible and this will surely affect your flying in general.

Perhaps you're not thinking about it right this moment, but at some point in the future, you may decide to get a commercial pilot certificate. That doesn't mean you have to run off to the airlines. There are many commercial pilots that never really get paid to fly, but it is nice to have the option.

Commercial Pilots in Wisconsin Need an Instrument Rating to Get a Job

Maybe your company has a nice aircraft that you'd like to spend some time in or you'd occasionally like to take on a paying passenger--whatever the case, although it's not required, you're going to want an instrument rating to go along with your commercial pilot certificate.

If you wait until then to get instrument rated, you're going to have a lot of training to do. Instead, reap the benefits of learning precise flying early and you can sail through commercial pilot training when you need it.

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Do You Want to Earn Your Instrument Rating IFR in Wisconsin?

Insurance rates are generally cheaper for instrument-rated pilots. Perhaps the poorest-kept secret of the aviation insurance industry is that instrument-rated pilots enjoy rates that are generally cheaper. The increased training instrument-rated pilots take on and their increased skill pay off in lower insurance premiums. Depending on the type of aircraft you fly, this can be a very significant amount of money.Legend has it that the instrument rating is the most difficult to earn of all licenses, ratings, and endorsements. And if you talk to an instrument-rated pilot, he or she will probably agree. However, the instrument rating could also be the most rewarding of all to earn, and the benefits and privileges of acquiring the rating are well worth the initial effort.

So, if you'd like to be a better pilot with lower insurance rates and you might get a commercial pilot certificate, you should definitely consider an instrument rating. Sure it may be difficult, but the sense of accomplishment and precision flying skill is more than worth it in the long run.

Legend has it that the instrument rating in Wisconsin is the most difficult to earn of all licenses, ratings, and endorsements. And if you talk to an instrument-rated pilot, he or she will probably agree. However, the instrument rating could also be the most rewarding of all to earn, and the benefits and privileges of acquiring the rating are well worth the initial effort.

Simply stated, the instrument rating allows pilots to fly under instrument flight rules (IFR) in Wisconsin, in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), and in class A airspace (the airspace between 18,000 feet msl and 60,000 feet msl). IMC is loosely defined as conditions that do not meet the basic requirements of operating under visual flight rules (VFR), including ceilings less than 1000 feet above airport elevation and/or visibility less than 3 miles at the airport.

Although the instrument rating gives pilots permission to operate in less than basic VFR conditions, it's not a "license" to fly in bad weather. Prudent pilots do not launch into deadly weather just because they are instrument rated. Learn about instrument rating training.

Fun Facts About Flight Dispatchers - Practical Test Standards Concept

Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 65 specifies the subject areas in which knowledge and skill must be demonstrated by the applicant before the issuance of an Aircraft Dispatcher Certificate. The CFRs provide the flexibility to permit the FAA to publish practical test standards containing the Areas of Operation and specific Tasks in which competency shall be demonstrated.

Useless Aviation Trivia You Must Know

ATL outside of Atlanta is the busiest US airport in the US, LAX in Los Angeles is second, third is ORD outside of Chicago, fourth is DFW near Dallas, fifth? Well, its JFK! College Park Airport (KCGS), in the city of College Park, Maryland is the world's oldest airport. KCGS was established in 1909 when Wilbur Wright arrived at the field to train two military officers in the US Army.

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