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Air Traffic Controller Training Costa Mesa California CA

Air Traffic Controller Training in Costa Mesa, CA - Where Do I start?

Air traffic controllers in Costa Mesa, CA play a vital role in modern aviation. From providing up to date weather information to keeping planes from getting too close, air traffic control is an exciting and necessary career. If you're considering becoming an air traffic controller inCosta Mesa, CA, you must go through a multi-step process that begins early.


Specifically, those training for an air traffic control career must be younger than 30 unless they already have experience as an air traffic controller (such as through the military). From there, you must go to college, apply for an ATC job, and attend the FAA training academy.

For Air Traffic Controller Training in Costa Mesa, CA Attend College or University

While not totally essential, the easiest way to begin a career as an air traffic controller is to go to college. There are numerous FAA-approved schools nearCosta Mesa, CA offering training through the Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative (AT-CTI) that will help you meet the minimum requirements for applying for an ATC opening with the FAA.

Once you have completed your two-year or four-year degree, you should receive a letter of recommendation from your school and apply for an ATC job.

If you've already gotten a degree or you're switching careers, you must have either progressively responsible full-time work experience or college study to qualify. Specifically, you need three years of work, four years of college, or some combination of the two to satisfy the minimum requirements.

Where You'll Work as an Air Traffic Controller

As an air traffic controller inCosta Mesa, CA, you can expect to work in one or all of these four areas:

At the airport - these controllers work at what's called the "tower" even though you may or may not actually be located in the tower. Tower controllers are responsible for local airport operations including reporting weather, issuing takeoff clearances, controlling aircraft on the ground, issuing runway assignments, handling all arriving and departing As an air traffic controller, you can expect to work in one or all of these four areas: At the airport - these controllers work at what's called the traffic, and above all, ensuring that all of these aircraft maintain a safe distance from each other at all times.

Near the airport - Terminal "approach" control, or TRACON for short, handles all inbound and outbound traffic in a specific area near an airport, or a group of airports. A good example is that most big cites have TRACON services that handle all aircraft in the general vicinity of the metropolitan area.

TRACON controllers make sure all aircraft are properly sequenced and spaced for safe arrivals and departures from all airports in the entire area.

En route - Between major metropolitan areas are vast expanses of airspace. "Center" controllers handle all traffic in these areas and rely on long-range radar and radio services to maintain contact with, and separation for, all aircraft under their control.

Flight Service Stations (FSS) - Flight service stations are regional offices that supply vital flight planning, weather, en route, communication, and navigation information via radio to pilots already airborne, and via telephone and computer to pilots planning flights on the ground.

Sometimes flight service specialists (people who work in an FSS) will help other ATC personnel by relaying radio messages to pilots who cannot talk to other ATC controllers because of current location and altitude.

Air Traffic Controller Requirements

Air traffic controllers fromCosta Mesa, CA must be good multitaskers, with the ability to make quick decisions efficiently. Most of the time, controllers are "working" several aircraft simultaneously, and are responsible for giving the pilots correct information via radio, making sure that the aircraft are not too close to each other (separation), and all the while, ensuring the efficient flow of traffic into and out of the controller's sector. Learn more about air traffic controller jobs.

Apply for an Air Traffic Controller Job in Costa Mesa, CA

Once you've met education or work experience requirements, you must pass an exam. The computer-based pre-employment exam requires about 8 hours to complete and is only offered by the FAA. Typically, there are more applicants than test slots, but AT-CTI applicants in good academic standing are guaranteed an opportunity to take the exam.

Once you've passed the exam, you are technically eligible for an air traffic controller job nearCosta Mesa, CA, unfortunately, you must then undergo an extensive background check and drug testing. It's safe to say, the FAA doesn't let just anyone work ATC.

Attend FAA Air Traffic Controller Training Near Costa Mesa, CA

Finally, once you're hired, the FAA will send you to Air Traffic Controller training for 12 weeks of intensive training on the ATC system, regulations, and equipment. Thankfully, if you're a graduate of an AT-CTI program, you may be able to bypass the first five weeks of training.

Once you've graduated from the academy, you will receive an assignment to a real air traffic control facility for an additional 2 to 4 years of on-the-job-training. If you make it through all that training, you're all set for one of the most fulfilling careers available today.

As you can tell, air traffic controller careers are not for the faint of heart. The training is extensive, but it has to be because ATC is a high-stakes career. If you think you've got what it takes, now is the time to start training for your air traffic controller career.

Air Traffic Controller Career Center in Costa Mesa, CA

An air traffic controller's primary responsibility is to "maintain separation" between all types of aircraft. Other responsibilities include aiding the swift and efficient movement of aircraft to and from airports and across great distances en route. Finally, air traffic controllers assist pilots in emergency situations.Air traffic controllers must be good multitaskers, with the ability to make quick decisions efficiently. Most of the time, controllers are

Air traffic controllers typically work for the U.S. Government and are employed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), although some controllers work in what are called "contract" towers where air traffic control (ATC) services are awarded to private companies. If you would like to begin training to become an air traffic controller, start now.

You must be 30 years old or less to apply for a job with ATC. Learn more about air traffic controller training.

Air Traffic Controller Salary Info - How Much Do Air Traffic Controllers in Costa Mesa, CA Make?

U.S. Air traffic controllers fromCosta Mesa, CA make a good living and have excellent benefits. According to a 2010 study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, most Air traffic controllers average $110,000 per year in salary, with some controllers making less and some making more.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the starting salary for new controllers was $37,070 in 2010. Controllers' salaries increase as they complete each new training phase. According to the FAA, controllers who have already completed on-the-job training had an average annual salary of $118,000 in 2010. Get more information about air traffic controller jobs here.

Interesting Helicopter and Fixed-wing Facts for Costa Mesa, CA

To avoid landing problems, the engine could be disconnected and the autogiro brought gently to rest by the rotor, which would gradually cease spinning as the machine reached the ground. Popular during the 1920s and 1930s, autogiros ceased to be produced after the refinement of the conventional helicopter.

The first helicopter to achieve completely untethered flight was the Cornu in 1907, which managed to hover one foot above the ground for 20 seconds.

Helicopter Spotlight for Costa Mesa, CA

The AgustaWestland Apache is a licence-built version of the AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopter for the British Army's Army Air Corps. The first eight helicopters were built by Boeing; the remaining 59 were assembled by Westland Helicopters (now part of AgustaWestland) at Yeovil, Somerset in England from Boeing-supplied kits. Changes from the AH-64D include Rolls-Royce engines, a new electronic defensive aids suite and a folding blade mechanism allowing the British version to operate from ships. The helicopter was initially designated WAH-64 by Westland Helicopters and was later designated Apache AH Mk 1 (often shortened to Apache Ah4) by the Ministry of Defence.

The Apache has become a valued form of close air support in the continuing conflict in Afghanistan, being deployed to the region since 2006. The Apache has been an object of controversy over the fitting of some munitions, such as cluster bombs and thermobaric weapons. Naval trials and temporary deployments at sea have proven the aircraft as an able platform to operate from the decks of ships, which is a unique application of the Apache amongst its operators. British Apaches served in the NATO 2011 military intervention in Libya operating from Royal Navy ships.