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Air Traffic Controller Training New Mexico NM

Air Traffic Control School in New Mexico

Air Traffic Controller Schools in New Mexico are actively recruiting students to replace the thousands of current controllers fromNew Mexico whose retirement is rapidly approaching. Now is the time to start your air traffic controller training inNew Mexico. Aviation Schools Online offers a complete list of air traffic controller schools nearNew Mexico.


Air Traffic Controller quick facts - Nearly all air traffic controllers are employed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), an agency of the Federal Government.

Replacement needs will continue to account for most job openings nearNew Mexico, reflecting the large number ofNew Mexico air traffic controllers who will be eligible to retire over the next decade. Competition to get into FAA training programs is expected to remain strong; however, graduates of Air Traffic Controller programs fromNew Mexico have good job prospects. Air traffic controllers aroundNew Mexico earn relatively high pay and have good benefits.

Research Careers in Air Traffic Control Here! Do you have what it takes to become an air traffic controller inNew Mexico? These pages will help you find out. Air Traffic Control jobs pay well and are one of the toughest positions to earn. Start out by doing some research.

Air Traffic Control Career - Where Can I Work?

While aircraft and pilots may steal the show when it comes to aviation, air traffic controllers are an absolutely essential element of the aviation industry. After you're hired as an air traffic controller, you'll go to an FAA Academy where you'll spend twelve weeks learning the basics of the ATC system, regulations, and equipment, plus much more. Students who graduated from an AT-CTI program are allowed to skip the first five weeks of training because they already covered the material in their college coursework.Without their highly-skilled eyes watching over and keeping pilots from running into each other, flying would harder than it already is. 

If you're considering an air traffic control career, chances are you already know this, but what you may not know is there are several places air traffic controllers work. Once you complete your training, you can work as a tower, TRACON, or En-route controller.
Tower

Of all the career paths available to air traffic controllers fromNew Mexico, this is probably the one most people picture. These controllers are generally located at the airport in the tower if there is one. They spend their days and nights overseeing operations at the airport level. They control local weather reporting and issuing clearances for taxi, takeoff, and landing. In short, tower controllers control the airport.

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Air Traffic Controller Salary Info - How Much Do Air Traffic Controllers in New Mexico Make?

U.S. Air traffic controllers make a good living and have excellent benefits. According to a 2010 study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, most Air traffic controllers average $110,000 per year in salary, with some controllers making less and some making more.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the starting salary for new controllers was $37,070 in 2010. Controllers' salaries increase as they complete each new training phase.

According to the FAA, controllers who have already completed on-the-job training had an average annual salary of $118,000 in 2010. Get more information about air traffic controller jobs here.

Air Traffic Controller Benefits

As an air traffic controller fromNew Mexico, you can expect excellent benefits. Health insurance and life insurance are standard, and controllers receive 13 to 26 paid days for vacation and 13 days of paid personal time per year. Besides the great pay, controllers have excellent retirement options too.

For example, air traffic controllers can retire at age 50 with far fewer years in service than other Federal employees, or they can extend their time to age 56 for an even better retirement package. However, if you work for a contract tower or flight service station, do a little research because those entities may operate with different benefits packages. Read more about air traffic controller jobs.

Terminal Approach Control

Terminal approach control, or TRACON, handle everything near the airport. They are usually located in the same facility as the tower controllers, but they don't handle traffic on the ground. TRACON handles every aircraft within a certain range--both inbound and outbound flights.

They may see traffic for a specific field or, as is more common in larger cities, multiple fields. These controllers are primarily concerned with sequencing and spacing aircraft for safe arrivals and departures.

En-route

Last but not least, en-route controllers handle all the airspace between major metropolitan areas. They typically work in dedicated facilities that are much larger than airport towers known as "centers." The center controllers work together to handle all traffic in specific regions by relying on long-range radar and radio services.

Once an aircraft is near its destination, the center controller will hand it off to approach control, who in turn will sequence the aircraft before handing it off to the tower controllers who will issue the landing clearance.

Air traffic controllers are an essential element of the aviation formula. They allow pilots to focus on flying their aircraft by providing weather services and helping pilots maintain separation in the sky. While the job may not come with as much glory as of the pilot, air traffic controllers are the linchpin that keeps the entire system safe and efficient.

FAA - A History of Fixed Wing Structures Info for New Mexico

Fixed Wing structural members are designed to carry a load or to resist stress. In designing an aircraft, every square inch of wing and fuselage, every rib, spar, and even each metal fitting must be considered in relation to the physical characteristics of the material of which it is made. Every part of the aircraft must be planned to carry the load to be imposed upon it.

Aviation Facts - Stability and Control of an Aircraft

An aircraft must have sufficient stability to maintain a uniform flightpath and recover from the various upsetting forces. Also, to achieve the best performance, the aircraft must have the proper response to the movement of the controls. Control is the pilot action of moving the flight controls, providing the aerodynamic force that induces the aircraft to follow a desired flightpath. When an aircraft is said to be controllable, it means that the aircraft responds easily and promptly to movement of the controls. Different control surfaces are used to control the aircraft about each of the three axes. Moving the control surfaces on an aircraft changes the airflow over the aircraft’s surface. This, in turn, creates changes in the balance of forces acting to keep the aircraft flying straight and level.

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