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Fixed Wing Pilot Jobs in Oklahoma

The most respected fixed-wing pilots from Oklahoma are able to plan their flights and ensure the airplane is safe and operable, and a lot more. Top paid fixed-wing pilots in Oklahoma also work to make sure the airplane's cargo has been loaded properly, and that weather conditions are safe and the aircraft's engine is running perfectly. 


Professional fixed-wing pilots looking for top-paying pilot jobs around ~regions~are expected to file flight plans with air traffic controllers and they must be able to modify flight plans in mid-flight due to the ever-changing weather conditions or aircraft performance issues.

Why do some fixed-wing pilots land all the best-paying fixed-wing pilot jobs in Oklahoma? Easy, they have the experience, the flight hours, they meet all the requirements, AND they are able to do takeoffs and landings and all the most difficult aspects of professional piloting (transporting people or cargo by airplane).

Most Oklahoma-based aviation employers hiring fixed-wing pilots for the top-paying fixed-wing pilot jobs in Oklahoma look for the ability to work well with others under pressure while showing the ability to coordinate and work flawlessly with copilots and flight engineers, and even flight attendants.

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FAA - A History of Plane Structures Facts for Oklahoma

There are five major stresses to which all aircraft are subjected: Bending. Bending stress is a combination of compression and tension. The rod in Figure 1-14E has been shortened (compressed) on the inside of the bend and stretched on the outside of the bend. A single member of the structure may be subjected to a combination of stresses. In most cases, the structural members are designed to carry end loads rather than side loads. They are designed to be subjected to tension or compression rather than bending.

Aviation Facts - High-Speed Aerodynamics

Listed below are a range of conditions that are encountered by aircraft as their designed speed increases. Subsonic conditions occur for Mach numbers less than one (100–350 mph). For the lowest subsonic conditions, compressibility can be ignored. As the speed of the object approaches the speed of sound, the flight Mach number is nearly equal to one, M = 1 (350–760 mph), and the flow is said to be transonic. At some locations on the object, the local speed of air exceeds the speed of sound. Compressibility effects are most important in transonic flows and lead to the early belief in a sound barrier. Flight faster than sound was thought to be impossible. In fact, the sound barrier was only an increase in the drag near sonic conditions because of compressibility effects. Because of the high drag associated with compressibility effects, aircraft are not operated in cruise conditions near Mach 1. Supersonic conditions occur for numbers greater than Mach 1, but less than Mach 3 (760–2,280mph). Compressibility effects of gas are important in the design of supersonic aircraft because of the shockwaves that are generated by the surface of the object. For high supersonic speeds, between Mach 3 and Mach 5 (2,280–3,600 mph), aerodynamic heating becomes a very important factor in aircraft design. For speeds greater than Mach 5, the flow is said to be hypersonic. At these speeds, some of the energy of the object now goes into exciting the chemical bonds which hold together the nitrogen and oxygen molecules of the air. At hypersonic speeds, the chemistry of the air must be considered when determining forces on the object. When the space shuttle re-enters the atmosphere at high hypersonic speeds, close to Mach 25, the heated air becomes an ionized plasma of gas, and the spacecraft must be insulated ted from the extremely high temperatures.

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