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Helicopter Pilot Jobs Maryland MD

Seeking a Professional Helicopter Pilot Job in Maryland

To land the top helicopter pilot jobs in Maryland depends so much upon the "type" of piloting job you are pursuing. Meaning, not all helicopter jobs inMaryland are the same. Not all helicopter jobs in Maryland are considered to be the "best-paying jobs." The top commercial helicopter pilot jobs around Maryland will require set minimum requirements. 


Brand new helicopter pilots from Maryland are very limited in the type of piloting jobs in Maryland they qualify for because new pilots typically don't have enough flight experience. Most entry-level helicopter pilot jobs in Maryland require a minimum of 1,200 flight hours. Brand new commercial pilots (those right out of pilot training school) typically have only 220 total flight hours. Two-hundred and twenty hours is not a lot of hours.

Unfortunately, many times there is a 1,000 flight hour gap between completing commercial flight training and having the minimum requirements to land an industry "entry-level" pilot job in Maryland. Somehow the new commercial helicopter graduate must earn 1,000 additional hours or they don't qualify for the best paying helicopter pilot jobs in Maryland. 

Due to a lack of flight experience, the only pilot job a new commercial pilot can land is the CFI job (Certified Flight Instructors), training new student pilots in Maryland. The truth is, most professional helicopter pilots start their piloting career as a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI). Their first entry-level helicopter pilot job is a CFI in Maryland.

In the early stages of a new helicopter pilot career, new pilots from Maryland are very limited in what helicopter pilot jobs they qualify for. The main problem with hiring brand new commercial pilots is that they do not have enough flight hours. Typically, a brand new commercial helicopter pilot in Maryland has earned 220 flight hours.

Essentially, the process of securing a commercial pilot rating will net a newly rated pilot with 220 total flight hours, and 100 of those hours are "pilot in command" hours, also known as "PIC" hours. The point is, the new commercial helicopter pilot in Maryland don't qualify for one of the good-paying pilot jobs in Maryland, therefore the only piloting jobs available are CFI jobs.

Commercial helicopter pilots only have a couple of ways to earn enough PIC hours to land the best-paying commercial piloting job in Maryland, and most pilots earn their required hours as Certified Flight Instructors.

Top-paying Helicopter Pilot Jobs in Maryland

Law Enforcement Pilot: Police Helicopter Pilots in Maryland are typically police officers and commercial helicopter pilots. The typical law enforcement pilot job requirements are simple and clear: Must be a US citizen, pass a background check, and has either attended and graduated from a police academy or is willing to participate in and graduate.

The flight requirements of helicopter pilots seeking a job as a law enforcement helicopter pilot in Maryland include a Commercial Instrument Rotor-wing Certificate, Class II Flight Physical, a minimum of 1,200 total times, 800 PIC hours, and 700 turbine hours.

Emergency Medical Services Helicopter Pilot: Professional helicopter pilots seeking a full-time job piloting for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) companies in Maryland need to be the best of the best. Professional helicopter pilots seeking a full-time job piloting for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) companies. Keep in mind, EMS helicopter pilots are the best of the best and the top dogs in the industry, therefore most employer give preference to pilots with previous EMS experience with VFR proficiency.Keep in mind, EMS helicopter pilots are "the best of the best" and the "top dogs" in the aviation industry, therefore most employers give preference to pilots with previous EMS experience with VFR proficiency.

Strong communication skills are a must. Desire to being an integral member of a medical-based team is a must. Job seekers must be able to perform strenuous physical tasks such as lifting and carrying weight up to 90 lbs.

Other helicopter pilot requirements include a current FAA Commercial Certificate, Class II Medical Certificate, Helicopter Instrument Rating, and it is preferred that pilot candidates possess ATP helicopter rating and have recent IFR experience.

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Utility Inspection Pilot: Utility Inspect Helicopter Pilots in Maryland must be able to survey powerlines using LiDAR and photographic/video equipment to inspect and document the condition of power poles. Top utility companies are looking for helicopter pilots with extraordinary helicopter experience flying in and around a "wire environment" (utility lines).

Helicopter pilots seeking employment with utility companies must demonstrate and prove their skills to operate a helicopter safely and in a professional manner. To land the best paying utility jobs, they must prove their ability to follow and comply with all Federal (FAA), State, and local regulations. Employers realize that the best utility helicopter pilots have established their ability to work independently and with a team.Utility Inspection Pilot: Utility Inspect Helicopter Pilots in Maryland must be able to survey powerlines using LiDAR and photographic/video equipment to inspect and document the condition of power poles. Top utility companies are looking for helicopter pilots with extraordinary helicopter experience flying in and around a

Typically, helicopter pilot job candidates need a minimum of 3000 hours as Pilot In Command, a minimum of 300 hours in a turbine, flying utility inspections around power lines with photography is preferred. Job candidates should have FAA commercial license, current medical, clean driving record, clean background check, clean drug test, and no accidents or incident reports.

Charter Tour Pilot: The top helicopter tour companies typically recruit full-time helicopter pilots from Maryland to fly public tours. Job seekers need a commercial pilot rating along with CFI and/or CFII.

Helicopter tour pilots must demonstrate their skills in operating a helicopter safely and in a professional manner. To land the best paying utility jobs, helicopter pilot candidates must prove their ability to follow and comply with all Federal (FAA), State, and local regulations.

Tour helicopter pilots have training in a Robinson R44 and Robinson R66, and turbine hours is preferred or considered an advantage. Helicopter tour pilots need a minimum of 250-1,000 hours and should be qualified for aerial photography, aerial surveys, and sightseeing tour jobs.

Certified Flight Instructor: Helicopter pilots from Maryland looking to land the best flight instructor jobs must have plenty of hours in a Robinson R22 and R44 and R66 Helicopters. Strangely enough, the highest-paid flight instructors also conduct sightseeing tours as long as the pilot meets specific hourly requirements.

Job candidates need to be able to operate as independent contractors working on an hourly basis, flying anywhere from 5 to 25 hours a week.

Flight training job candidates need the following to be current: FAA Commercial Rotorcraft Certificate, Instrument Rotorcraft Rating, Flight Instructor Certificate, (“Instrument” rated Flight Instructor Rating usually preferred), Class II Medical Certificate, and SFAR CFI Endorsement for R22 and R44

Minimum flight experience - a minimum of 250 hours total time in a helicopter, and preferably 150 of those hours in Robinson Rotorcraft.

FAA - A History of Aircraft Structures Details for Maryland

Into the 1930s, all-metal aircraft accompanied new lighter and more powerful engines. Larger semimonocoque fuselages were complimented with stress-skin wing designs. Fewer truss and fabric aircraft were built. World War II (WWII) brought about a myriad of aircraft designs using all metal technology. Deep fuel-carrying wings were the norm, but the desire for higher flight speeds prompted the development of thin-winged aircraft in which fuel was carried in the fuselage. The first composite structure aircraft, the De Havilland Mosquito, used a balsa wood sandwich material in the construction of the fuselage. The fiberglass radome was also developed during this period.

Aerodynamics and the Laws of Physics

The law of conservation of energy states that energy may neither be created nor destroyed. Motion is the act or process of changing place or position. An object may be in motion with respect to one object and motionless with respect to another. For example, a person sitting quietly in an aircraft flying at 200 knots is at rest or motionless with respect to the aircraft; however, the person and the aircraft are in motion with respect to the air and to the earth.

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